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Koul, Anjni – Teaching Science, 2017
This article presents an instructional strategy called Premise-Reasoning- Outcome (PRO) designed to support students in the construction of scientific explanations. Informed by the philosophy of science and linguistic studies of science, the PRO strategy involves identifying three components of a scientific explanation: (i) premise--an accepted…
Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Science Instruction, Science Education, Scientific Concepts
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Espinosa, Allen A.; Marasigan, Arlyne C.; Datukan, Janir T. – Teaching Science, 2016
This study explored how students visualise the states and classifications of matter with the use of scientific models. Misconceptions of students in using scientific models were also identified to formulate a teaching framework. To elicit data in the study, a Visual Conception Questionnaire was administered to thirty-four (34), firstyear, general…
Descriptors: Teaching Models, Foreign Countries, Misconceptions, Scientific Concepts
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Alagumalai, Sivakumar – Teaching Science, 2015
Thinking scientifically consists of systematic observation, experiment, measurement, and the testing and modification of research questions. In effect, science is about measurement and the understanding of causation. Measurement is an integral part of science and engineering, and has pertinent implications for the human sciences. No measurement is…
Descriptors: Science Education, Error of Measurement, Observation, Scientific Concepts
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Tang, Kok-Sing – Teaching Science, 2015
This article presents an instructional strategy called Premise-Reasoning-Outcome (PRO) designed to support students in the construction of scientific explanations. Informed by the philosophy of science and linguistic studies of science, the PRO strategy involves identifying three components of a scientific explanation: (i) premise--an accepted…
Descriptors: Educational Strategies, Science Instruction, Science Education, Scientific Concepts
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Tasker, Roy – Teaching Science, 2014
Why is chemistry so difficult? A seminal paper by Johnstone (1982) offered an explanation for why science in general, and chemistry in particular, is so difficult to learn. He proposed that an expert in chemistry thinks at three levels; the macro (referred to as the observational level in this article), the sub-micro (referred to as the molecular…
Descriptors: Chemistry, Visualization, Molecular Structure, Theory Practice Relationship
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Kennedy, John; Lyons, Terry; Quinn, Frances – Teaching Science, 2014
Is there a crisis in Australian science and mathematics education? Declining enrolments in upper secondary Science and Mathematics courses have gained much attention from the media, politicians and high-profile scientists over the last few years, yet there is no consensus amongst stakeholders about either the nature or the magnitude of the…
Descriptors: High Schools, Secondary School Science, Declining Enrollment, Student Participation
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Lim, Kieran F. – Teaching Science, 2012
Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…
Descriptors: Chemistry, Textbooks, Science Instruction, Science Education
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Chandrasegaran, A. L.; Treagust, David F.; Mocerino, Mauro – Teaching Science, 2011
This study involved the evaluation of the efficacy of a planned instructional program to facilitate understanding of the macroscopic, submicroscopic and symbolic representational systems when describing and explaining chemical reactions by sixty-five Grade 9 students in a Singapore secondary school. A two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument…
Descriptors: Diagnostic Tests, Chemistry, Foreign Countries, Grade 9