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Kearns, Devin M.; Whaley, Victoria M. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Learning to read English is more difficult than in most other alphabetic languages. It sometimes seems there are not reliable rules for linking letters with sounds. Teaching students all of the letter patterns they may find in texts is no simple task. Students struggle processing the sounds in words, so even words with simple spellings are…
Descriptors: Dyslexia, Reading Skills, Spelling, Memory
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Sayeski, Kristin L.; Earle, Gentry A.; Davis, Rosalie; Calamari, Josie – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
For many, the terms dyslexia and Orton Gillingham (OG) go hand in hand, yet much is misunderstood about both terms. Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin and results in difficulty with accurate or fluent word recognition, reading, and spelling. OG is an approach to teaching individuals with dyslexia to read…
Descriptors: Dyslexia, Special Education, Literacy Education, Reading Instruction
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Kearns, Devin M.; Hancock, Roeland; Hoeft, Fumiko; Pugh, Kenneth R.; Frost, Stephen J. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Advances in neurobiological research have created new opportunities for understanding and exploring dyslexia. The purpose of this article is to (a) provide a straightforward, although not overly simplified, overview of neurological research on dyslexia and (b) make connections between neurological research and classroom interventions for students…
Descriptors: Neurology, Biology, Dyslexia, Phonics
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Corr, Catherine – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) recognizes that all children and youth with disabilities have the right to live and flourish in a safe environment where they are protected from maltreatment. In January 2018, CEC formed a work group to write a policy statement on the prevention of and response to maltreatment. The complete CEC Policy on…
Descriptors: Disabilities, Children, Youth, Child Abuse
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Dawson, Kara; Antonenko, Pavlo; Lane, Holly; Zhu, Jiawen – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Individuals with dyslexia face numerous challenges in school and daily life. Although effective intervention may reduce those challenges (Mather & Wendling, 2011; Shaywitz, 2003; Snowling & Hulme, 2012), most individuals with dyslexia benefit from additional supports that allow them to learn and function independently. The term assistive…
Descriptors: Dyslexia, Assistive Technology, Intervention, Technology Uses in Education
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Lindstrom, Jennifer H. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
There is often confusion about the terms used to label or describe a reading problem. Clinicians and researchers use different terminology than the schools. For example, medical professionals, psychologists, and other practitioners outside of the school often use the term "dyslexia," "reading disorder," and "specific…
Descriptors: Dyslexia, Reading Difficulties, Compliance (Legal), Eligibility
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Spear-Swerling, Louise – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Structured Literacy (SL) approaches are often recommended for students with dyslexia and other poor decoders (e.g., International Dyslexia Association, 2017). Examples of SL approaches include the Wilson Reading System (Wilson, 1988), Orton-Gillingham (Gillingham & Stillman, 2014), the Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing Program (Lindamood &…
Descriptors: Literacy Education, Reading Instruction, Dyslexia, Learning Disabilities
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Fowler, Susan A.; Coleman, Mary Ruth B.; Bogdan, William K. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
The "State of the Special Education Profession" survey was commissioned by the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Pioneers Division and supported by CEC. It provides a current snapshot of the state of the special education profession and serves as a foundation for CEC leadership and program development. The goal of the survey is to…
Descriptors: Special Education, Special Education Teachers, Teaching (Occupation), Individualized Education Programs
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Commisso, Colleen E.; Gaier, Kelsey; Kern, Lee; Majeika, Caitlyn E.; Van Camp, Alyssa M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Kelly, Samantha – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Multi-tiered systems of support are frequently used in school settings because of their efficiency and effectiveness (McIntosh & Goodman, 2016). The rationale for multi-tiered systems of support is to provide early and systematic intervention to all students with increasing intensity of intervention provided as needed (Sugai & Horner,…
Descriptors: Intervention, Positive Behavior Supports, Outcomes of Treatment, Behavior Problems
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Rodgers, Wendy J.; Weiss, Margaret P. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Nearly 63% of students with disabilities are included in general education classrooms for some part of their day, and at the high school level, 79% participate in state reading and math assessments (U.S. Department of Education, 2016). Middle and high school classes pose particular challenges because, unlike elementary classrooms, they are usually…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Team Teaching, Disabilities, General Education
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Blackwell, William H.; Stockall, Nancy – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
It is the responsibility of special educators to understand and interpret the results of high-stakes assessments for educational purposes and for communication to parents. To help teachers understand and accurately communicate high-stakes testing results, the authors describe a set of research-based strategies in the "RISC" process:…
Descriptors: Test Interpretation, High Stakes Tests, Test Results, Special Education
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Powell, Sarah R.; Stevens, Elizabeth A.; Hughes, Elizabeth M. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Many educators use informal math language to make the content more accessible for middle school students, yet this use of informal language may have unintended consequences. Informal language may hinder students' development of a deep math lexicon and understanding of concepts and procedures across grade levels. Becoming proficient with math…
Descriptors: Mathematics Instruction, Middle School Teachers, Middle School Students, Language Usage
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Fallon, Lindsay M.; Kurtz, Kathryn D. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Students may benefit from evidence-based interventions to support their classroom learning (Carmago et al., 2016). Additionally, laws and policies, such as the Every Student Succeeds Act (2015) and the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (2006), mandate the implementation of evidence-based practices to improve student outcomes in schools.…
Descriptors: Intervention, Student Behavior, Evidence Based Practice, Program Effectiveness
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Swanson, Elizabeth; Stevens, Elizabeth A.; Wexler, Jade – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Students in middle school social studies classes are expected to learn content through text. Unfortunately, many students, particularly those with disabilities, struggle to comprehend grade-level texts (NCES, 2017). Implementing high-quality, text-based discussions is no easy task, yet it provides a way to support students with disabilities in the…
Descriptors: Learner Engagement, Disabilities, Middle School Students, Discussion (Teaching Technique)
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Barczak, Mary A. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Financial responsibility is an important step toward independence for any student. This is particularly true for students with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD), who may not have access to instruction in personal finance or basic financial transactions. When planning for transition, teachers should take into account skills students…
Descriptors: Students with Disabilities, Community Based Instruction (Disabilities), Simulation, Intellectual Disability
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