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ERIC Number: EJ1180324
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2018
Pages: 6
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0034-0510
Teachers' Knowledge of Children's Literature: What Genres Do Teachers Read?
Akins, M.; Tichenor, M.; Heins, E.; Piechura, K.
Reading Improvement, v55 n2 p63-68 Sum 2018
Research stresses the importance of teachers' competency in children's literature to produce successful readers (Burgess et al., 2011; Collins & Safford, 2008; Cremin et al., 2009). Teachers' competency in children's literature includes the knowledge of quality authors and their texts and the ability of teachers to discuss multiple genres. Further, Ripp (2016) highlights the need of teachers knowing and reading a variety of books in order to recommend appropriate titles to students. Students with little reading skill need a teacher who is a mentor and role model for fostering a positive attitude and love for reading. Williams, Hall, Hedrick, Lamkin and Abendroth (2013) found that students who are involved in effective independent reading settings develop greater enjoyment for reading, are more engaged in their reading, and read more widely, resulting in increased reading achievement. Teachers who create effective reading environments model a love of reading by talking about books, enthusiastically reading aloud, motivating students to read for enjoyment through discussions with students about their books, and increasing students' opportunities to read (Reutzel & Juth, 2014). However, in a study to identify teachers' knowledge of children's literature, Cunningham et al. (2004) found that most teachers were unable to identify book titles appropriate for grades they taught when given a list of real and fake children's book titles. Moreover, in a study examining teachers' leisure reading habits and reading instruction, Burgess, Sargent, and Smith (2011) concluded that teachers who knew more about children's books were more likely to implement effective literacy strategies. Despite the research focusing on the importance of teachers' knowledge of children's books, there is a gap in the literature regarding certain titles and genres that teachers know. The purpose of this study is to examine teachers' knowledge of children's books, specifically focusing on book titles from multiple genres. In this article, we discuss the results of this study and provide suggestions on how school districts can expose teachers to a broad spectrum of children's literature.
Project Innovation, Inc. P.O. Box 8508 Spring Hill Station, Mobile, AL 36689-0508. Tel: 251-343-1878; Fax: 251-343-1878; Web site: http://www.projectinnovation.com/reading-improvement.html
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Elementary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A