NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing all 11 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2018
The article investigates several ways in which creating, entering, and playing games requires uniquely human levels of intelligence. It examines an element of our evolutionary heritage and the possibility that games (particularly in the form of sport) were among the first elements of culture. It describes sport as a "way of knowing," a…
Descriptors: Play, Games, Intelligence, Athletics
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2012
Disabilities are commonly conceptualized in dualistic ways--specifically as mental or physical in nature and as located in the self rather than in the "other" or "out there." In this essay I reflect on the consequences of a more holistic understanding of both handicaps and special education. This new approach, I suggest, would…
Descriptors: Disabilities, Physical Education, Special Education, Play
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2008
Silos and bunkers have been allies in the development of kinesiology for nearly 50 years. Silos of specialization allow us to go toe-to-toe with researchers in parent disciplines, compete for grants, and otherwise spread our academic wings. The bunkers of utility and generic movement provide an important degree of legitimacy for a subject matter…
Descriptors: Exercise Physiology, Physical Activity Level, Physical Activities, Human Body
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Thomas, Jerry R.; Clark, Jane E.; Feltz, Deborah L.; Kretchmar, R. Scott; Morrow, James R., Jr.; Reeve, T. Gilmour; Wade, Michael G. – Quest, 2007
This paper provides a description and documentation of two significant events in the history of our field: (1) the development of our field and the doctoral program review process and outcome by the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education; and (2) the process by which the Academy successfully had "kinesiology" included as a…
Descriptors: Physical Education, Discipline, Physical Activities, Health Promotion
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2007
It is difficult to know what to do with meaning. Some kinesiologists, particularly those in the humanities, would argue that it should be given due attention--perhaps even priority attention. Others would argue that meaning is unimportant or simply impossible to study in any objective way. This conundrum can be solved by adopting a new research…
Descriptors: Kinetics, Human Body, Motor Development, Educational Philosophy
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2006
One of the greatest challenges we face in kinesiology is changing behavior--specifically, converting habitually sedentary individuals into active human beings. This task is not an easy one. Thus, when we adopt Easy Street strategies that focus on introducing, informing, and entertaining, we have very little hope of effecting such conversions. Easy…
Descriptors: Philosophy, Exercise Physiology, Attitudes, Physical Education
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2005
The papers presented at the 2004 Academy meetings can be thought of as pieces from jigsaw puzzles. While the employment of this metaphor over the years has been useful, we may be ready for a new image, one that is both more accurate and inspiring. We can picture ourselves working at different locations along a river bank. Some of us work upstream,…
Descriptors: Physiology, Anatomy, Ethics, Exercise Physiology
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2001
All elements of an active lifestyle need not be meaningful. Good active habits of living can be generated without significant reliance on excitement or other kinds of notable meaning. The development of active living habits depend partly on enlightened social policy, but such policies are rare in the United States. Consequently, kinesiologists…
Descriptors: Health Behavior, Higher Education, Life Style, Physical Activities
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 2000
Uses philosophical writings, a novel about baseball, and a nonfiction work on rowing to analyze levels of meaning in physical activity, showing why three popular methods for enhancing meaning have not succeeded and may have moved some students away from deeper levels of meaning. The paper suggests that using hints taken from the three books could…
Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, Physical Activities, Physical Activity Level, Physical Education
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Kretchmar, R. Scott; And Others – Quest, 1993
Three papers are presented on the meaning of being ethical in the study of physical activity: (1) "Philosophy of Ethics" (R. S. Kretchmar); (2) "Codes of Ethics: Functions, Form, Structure, Problems, and Possibilities" (W.P. Fraleigh); and (3) "Ethics, Codes, and Behavior" (J.N. Drowatzky). (SM)
Descriptors: Codes of Ethics, Decision Making, Ethics, Higher Education
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Kretchmar, R. Scott – Quest, 1988
For physical education to achieve a more respectable status in academia, it will have to strengthen, clarify and limit its mission and provide a more liberal education, one whose value is seen in empowering people, rather than in refining physical skills as ends in themselves. These objectives are discussed and analyzed. (JL)
Descriptors: Accountability, Educational Objectives, Higher Education, Physical Education