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Hillbrink, Alessa; Jucks, Regina – Psychology Learning and Teaching, 2019
An academic career in psychology typically begins with a role reversal: young academics, who were only recently being taught, become doctoral researchers and teachers. Studies at two German universities provide insights into how students and early-career academics (ecas) in psychology view research and teaching and how their perspectives might…
Descriptors: Psychology, College Faculty, Beginning Teachers, Student Attitudes
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Jucks, Regina; Hillbrink, Alessa – Psychology Learning and Teaching, 2017
In Germany, most PhD psychology students are engaged in research and teach as well. As a result, they may experience both synergy and competition between these two activities. How do PhD psychology students themselves perceive the relationship between research and teaching? And how does this perception depend on their conceptions of research and…
Descriptors: Psychology, Graduate Students, Doctoral Programs, Relationship
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Hellmann, Jens H.; Paus, Elisabeth; Jucks, Regina – Psychology Learning and Teaching, 2014
Seeing the need to change parts of one's teaching project may be the starting point for scholars to seek inspiration and guidance from educational psychologists for innovation in their teaching. In this report, the authors address the question of how educational psychologists can assist lecturers in higher education with the implementation of…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Educational Psychology, Instructional Innovation, Instructional Improvement
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Hansen, Miriam; Jucks, Regina – Psychology Learning and Teaching, 2014
A significant amount of communication between lecturers and students takes place via e-mail. This study provides evidence that two types of cultural cues contained in the e-mail impacts lecturers' linguistic adaptation to, and appraisal of, the student. A total of 186 psychology lecturers from universities in Germany answered a fictitious…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Computer Mediated Communication, Psychology, Electronic Mail