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Showing 121 to 135 of 169 results Save | Export
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Leader, Wendy – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Jen and Michael agreed that it felt like a mixed blessing when the kindergarten teacher told them she thought their daughter was "very creative." The teacher had commented on Allison's love of dramatic and imaginative play, her bold and expressive artwork, her knack for solving problems with numbers and shapes, and her delight in finding…
Descriptors: Kindergarten, Creativity, Parents, Parent Role
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Summer activities have grown old. Going swimming has lost its allure, and boredom has set in. No matter how well parents have planned interesting and educational activities for the summer months or how much they have enjoyed the freedom from stricter schedules and more rigid bedtimes, it is time to transition back to the routines of the school…
Descriptors: Teacher Student Relationship, Gifted, Parent School Relationship, Advocacy
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Willis, Mariam – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Best Practices, Parent Associations, Advocacy
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Smutny, Joan F. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
For many young gifted English Language Learners (ELLs), going to an American school is like a trip to Mars. Everything and everyone looks strange. Many ELLs feel unsure of their abilities when they discover that their proficiency in English can sometimes hinder achievement. They wonder what the other kids think of their speech, their accents,…
Descriptors: Gifted, English (Second Language), Creativity, Second Language Learning
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Honeck, Ellen – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Children, particularly young children, demonstrate characteristics of giftedness in many different ways. These characteristics manifest themselves based on gender, experiences, cultural identity, personal passions and interests, and family or community. Gifted children develop asynchronously. Morelock (2000) stated that "asynchrony in the gifted…
Descriptors: Gifted, Psychological Patterns, Coping, Physical Development
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Schader, Robin – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Whether or not it is conscious, parents, caregivers, and teachers are looking for indicators that a child is not "fitting in" with peers. In most cases, teachers and parents are looking for problems or learning difficulties that need to be addressed because the earlier a problem is discovered and diagnosed, the more likely an intervention or…
Descriptors: Gifted, Learning Problems, Caregivers, Young Children
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Foster, Joanne – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
It may sound trite but it is nevertheless true that a person needs "health" and "happiness" in order to thrive. In this article, the author looks at what contributes to children's well-being (of body and mind), so as to enable them to flourish. She encourages readers to think about what they can do to encourage kids to be health-conscious and to…
Descriptors: Psychological Patterns, Well Being, Child Rearing, Child Development
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
"Developmentally appropriate practice" (DAP) is a term tossed about by practitioners as if everyone understands exactly what it means. DAP seems self-explanatory in that it requires educators to use only those strategies for teaching and discipline that are appropriate for the age of the child. The basic tenet of DAP rests on the assumed knowledge…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Teaching Methods, Student Needs, Child Development
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Steinmeyer, Patricia – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Advanced verbal ability is a trait associated with giftedness, and as a teacher, the author observes that many high-ability children flourish in the classroom when they are encouraged to explain their thoughts and reasoning. Engaging children in discussion helps students gain knowledge, think creatively, and develop critical thinking skills.…
Descriptors: Family Environment, Verbal Ability, Discussion (Teaching Technique), Parent Child Relationship
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Deitz, Christine – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Today's gifted children in middle school truly need advocates to ensure that school remains challenging through the middle grades and that the actions related to learning and talent development are positive experiences. Middle-grade advocates need a reason, a bit of prep, and a plan in order to be super advocates for children. As Chair for the…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Stakeholders, Middle School Students, Advocacy
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
In this article, the author shares the story about her son who has advanced intellectual ability and how she used science to motivate him. She says for advanced learners, the study of science encourages them to ask those deep questions without feeling as though they are out of step with their peers. Parents can support their children's natural…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Internet, Student Motivation, Science Instruction
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Terry, Alice W. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
How can parents help their children develop the sensitivity and compassion of people like Henry David Thoreau, Mahatma Gandhi, Rachel Carson, and Martin Luther King, Jr.? Participation for gifted students in service-learning programs, both in and out of school, may be one helpful method. In the last two decades, there has been a resurgence of…
Descriptors: Altruism, Academically Gifted, Service Learning, Gifted
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Foster, Joanne – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
There are many "E" words that relate meaningfully to giftedness at home, school, and beyond. In this article, the author expands upon some explicit examples--with an emphasis on the essence of giftedness, and on external and experiential elements.
Descriptors: Gifted, Semantics, Experiential Learning, Definitions
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Gatto-Walden, Patricia – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Many intellectually gifted children have equally compassionately gifted hearts. They care deeply about the well-being of others around them and throughout the world. These caring children innately live the guiding principle of brotherhood and interdependence among all life. They worry for themselves, and they worry for others. Some days they…
Descriptors: Caring, World Views, Gifted, Educational Change
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Young gifted children can become passionately interested in social justice. It makes sense that children who are astutely aware their own differences could and would become interested in the well-being of others. It seems that preschool programs have been slow to recognize the value of service-learning to their students, but Freeman and King…
Descriptors: Social Justice, Gifted, Preschool Children, Service Learning
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