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Showing 61 to 75 of 169 results Save | Export
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Gadzikowski, Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Helping daughters recognize science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in their daily lives, even in tasks like feeding the dog, baking a cake, or packing a suitcase, supports and encourages their STEM interests and abilities. Often young girls, even those who are very bright, aren't accustomed to thinking of themselves as being good at…
Descriptors: Females, Daughters, Parent Role, Academic Achievement
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Rimm, Sylvia – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Educators in the field of gifted education attempt to not only accelerate curriculum for their students, but also to encourage and expand their critical and creative thinking. They often explain this creative approach to students as "out-of-the-box" thinking. "The box" is an effective analogy to help children understand how to…
Descriptors: Underachievement, Creative Thinking, Creativity, Academically Gifted
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Worley, Cassie – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Considerable research has been published on society's expectations and attitudes toward females. Men think the most important qualities in the ideal woman are attractiveness, sexiness, and kindness. The media suggests females should value physical beauty and marriageability. Girls should be obedient, caring, pretty, and polite. These unreasonable…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Females, Child Rearing, Psychological Patterns
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Pfeiffer, Linda E. – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Few things strike fear in the hearts of parents like sending their child off to middle school. Parents of gifted learners fear for their child's safety--both emotional and physical--and their academic well-being. Having survived this transition, it occurred to the author that this experience would make an interesting research project and,…
Descriptors: Effective Schools Research, Middle Schools, School Size, Leadership Effectiveness
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Cramond, Bonnie – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
We teach our children manners, what to do in certain emergencies, and other life basics, but most of us do not intentionally teach our children about thinking strategies and creative problem solving. Perhaps this is the case because many of us have never formalized these processes within ourselves so that we feel capable of communicating them to…
Descriptors: Creative Thinking, Creativity, Child Development, Parent Role
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Olmstead, Gwen – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
The author shares that her journey with gifted homeschooling was filled with folly and a slow learning curve. By sharing some of the struggles and insights she faced, the author hopes others will benefit or find solace in knowing they are not alone when their square peg children do not fit into round holes. In this article the author discusses:…
Descriptors: Home Schooling, Gifted, Mothers, Parent Attitudes
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Jeweler, Sue; Barnes-Robinson, Linda – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
When parents and teachers help gifted kids use the metaphor "learning through different lenses," amazing things happen: Horizons open up. Ideas are focused. Thoughts are magnified and clarified. They see the big picture. Metaphoric thinking offers new and exciting ways to see the world. Viewing the world through different lenses provides…
Descriptors: Figurative Language, Educational Practices, Educational Philosophy, Educational Strategies
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Yamada, Sylvia – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Meeting the needs of gifted students is challenging even in traditional contexts and settings. Well-known issues include a limited choice of schools, underrepresentation of certain populations, and, often, the lack of facilities and support for high-ability students. Imagine, then, the further complexities of high-ability Third Culture Kids (TCKs)…
Descriptors: Gifted, School Choice, Student Mobility, Cultural Influences
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Foster, Joanne – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
As part of her series, "ABCs of Being Smart," Joanne Foster presents time-tested tips for parents of toddlers to teens. Categories include: traits to tap when meeting with teachers to strengthen home and school connections or resolve any issues; strategies for parents to add to their "toolbox"; and tactical measures to consider…
Descriptors: Parent Role, Child Rearing, Parent School Relationship, Parent Teacher Cooperation
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Smutny, Joan Franklin – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
One of the most common questions the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) receives from parents is, "How should I advocate for my child in the classroom?" Dr. Joan Smutny first tackled this topic for "Parenting for High Potential" in 2002, but her practical, step-by-step approach is still very applicable today. Some…
Descriptors: Gifted, Children, Parent School Relationship, Advocacy
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Helfer, Jason A. – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Historically, music programs in K-12 schools have emphasized performance opportunities for children and young people. Until the release of the 1994 National Standards in Music, targeted instruction in composition was frequently overlooked due to the emphasis on performance as well as the expectations of what a school music program ought to produce…
Descriptors: Musical Composition, Music, Teaching Methods, Music Education
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Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Creativity has and always will be at the heart of American culture. It is evidenced in our daily lives thanks to the contributions of society's most revered icons. For decades, creativity has languished in the educational system. Creativity is not the norm in schools, and seems to only survive in classrooms or enrichment programs when highly…
Descriptors: Creativity, Creative Activities, Creative Development, Creative Teaching
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Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Creativity is best identified in children and adults by looking for behaviors such as flexibility, playfulness, curiosity, originality, intellectual risk-taking, and persistence in thoughts or actions. These creative behaviors occur at certain times and under certain conditions in everyone. But, they can also be either enhanced or severely…
Descriptors: Creativity, Child Rearing, Parenting Styles, Child Development
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Pfeiffer, Linda E. – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
When researching school options, parents may want to look for schools with high-growth scores which, according to research, may be indicators of other characteristics such as programming, leadership, culture, and size. This quick guide offers parents tips on how to identify high-growth schools and what to ask when evaluating school options. An…
Descriptors: School Choice, High Achievement, School Effectiveness, Educational Indicators
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Smith, Fiona – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
The identification of his son's high ability can cause a father to confront his own experiences as a gifted child and adult and change his emotional life, family dynamics, and career. Over the past decade, Fiona Smith has worked closely with numerous multi-generations of grandfathers, fathers, and sons in Australia to analyze their backgrounds,…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Males, Talent Identification, Ability Identification
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