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Alexander, Lori – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
Perhaps as a toddler, your high-potential child was constantly engaged in her surroundings, absorbing information and making unexpected and exciting connections. When she reached school age, she was likely excited to spend all day, every day learning. Then, reality hit. Teachers spent the entire day teaching other students to stand safely in line,…
Descriptors: Teamwork, Student Needs, Academically Gifted, Student Attitudes
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Goudelock, Jessa D. Luckey – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
Gifted African American students express characteristics of giftedness in significantly different ways when compared to their White counterparts. However, parents are not often aware how to recognize giftedness in their children, and teachers are unaware of the nuances in identifying and supporting gifted African American students. For parents of…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, African American Students, Student Characteristics, Talent Identification
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Peters, Pamela M. – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Research suggests that academic competitions provide opportunities for content differentiation as well as emotional growth. Participating students learn how to cope with subjectivity, engage in friendly competition with their peers, get exposed to role models in their field of interest, and build resilience. With limited resources, school…
Descriptors: Competition, Program Implementation, Elementary School Mathematics, Secondary School Mathematics
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Koenderink, Tijl; Hovinga, Femke – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
"Falling out" of education is a rampant problem among gifted children and adults in the Netherlands. An educated guess is that one-third of the gifted adults are unhappy with where they are in their lives and careers. This article discusses ways in which parents or teachers can make a difference by seeing the whole gifted child, creating…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Academically Gifted, Dropout Prevention, Dropouts
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Mullet, Dianna R.; Rinn, Anne N. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Some gifted children suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs a child's functioning. For a diagnosis of ADHD, children under the age of 17 must display at least six symptoms of inattention or hyperactivity/impulsivity in at least two different settings (school and home, for example),…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Child Behavior, Academically Gifted
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Boazman, Janette – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
In the gifted community, many voices offer research, information, and advice on what gifted children need. University professors who study gifted children share their findings through research, published articles, and books. State gifted education associations and the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) publish important information…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Service Learning, Acceleration (Education), Summer Programs
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Parenting for High Potential, 2014
Many topics in the world of gifted are evergreen. Whether it be 1964 or 2014, they're still relevant. In this issue, "Parenting for High Potential" takes a peek into the archives to look at topics that have run in various March issues of PHP through the years. No matter where you are on the gifted journey, there's something here for…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Academically Gifted, Creativity, Young Children
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Miller, Erin – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
It is report card time at your child's school. You are curious as to how your child is being perceived and how well the teacher is meeting his or her needs. As you expect, there is a neat line of good grades. At the bottom is written this note: "(Your child) is doing well on her school work, but she does not suffer fools gladly."…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Parent School Relationship, Parents, Student Needs
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Davis, Joy Lawson – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
An effective and meaningful classroom for high-ability students is one in which teaching and learning is focused on meeting students' intellectual, academic, and psychosocial needs using specific strategies to impact their learning today as they prepare for tomorrow. As parents become more engaged with teachers, it also is important for them…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, High Achievement, Educational Environment, Student Needs
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Shive, Lauren – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
Although ADHD may be overdiagnosed in gifted children, ADHD and other disabilities can also be overlooked in this population. Young children in particular may be able to compensate for their disabilities to the point where these weaknesses are effectively masked by their giftedness, delaying a diagnosis and intervention. Such twice-exceptional…
Descriptors: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Children, Academically Gifted, Disability Identification
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Today the author received the umpteenth parental request from a mother wanting help with her child who is reading far above grade level and yet remains in an on-grade-level reading group. The frustration from this and every other parent who has spoken to the author about this subject is palatable. Parents want what is best for their child, but in…
Descriptors: Advocacy, Gifted, Special Needs Students, Student Needs
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Willis, Mariam – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Best Practices, Parent Associations, Advocacy
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
"Developmentally appropriate practice" (DAP) is a term tossed about by practitioners as if everyone understands exactly what it means. DAP seems self-explanatory in that it requires educators to use only those strategies for teaching and discipline that are appropriate for the age of the child. The basic tenet of DAP rests on the assumed knowledge…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Teaching Methods, Student Needs, Child Development
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Deitz, Christine – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Today's gifted children in middle school truly need advocates to ensure that school remains challenging through the middle grades and that the actions related to learning and talent development are positive experiences. Middle-grade advocates need a reason, a bit of prep, and a plan in order to be super advocates for children. As Chair for the…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Stakeholders, Middle School Students, Advocacy
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Muratori, Michelle; Brody, Linda – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
The rapid growth of the Talent Search movement from its early roots with the work of Julian C. Stanley's Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) unquestionably resulted from strong partnerships with schools. In this article, the authors share some of the early obstacles that had to be overcome in order for partnerships to be established,…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Elementary Secondary Education, Talent, Student Needs
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