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Schroth, Stephen T.; Daniels, Janese; McCormick, Kimberly – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
Parents recognize that most children today are keenly interested in technology and often prefer working in ways that use a variety of media and other forms of communication that are different than the way many children learned even a decade before. Many young learners look for ways to include technology in all aspects of their learning, ranging…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Academically Gifted, STEM Education, Technology Uses in Education
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Alexander, Lori – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
Perhaps as a toddler, your high-potential child was constantly engaged in her surroundings, absorbing information and making unexpected and exciting connections. When she reached school age, she was likely excited to spend all day, every day learning. Then, reality hit. Teachers spent the entire day teaching other students to stand safely in line,…
Descriptors: Teamwork, Student Needs, Academically Gifted, Student Attitudes
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Kiewra, Kenneth A. – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
The one thing that most students have in common is that they are not taught note taking and study strategies in school or home. However, it is essential that parents and educators spend time teaching gifted children how to organize their lessons, how to analyze the material, and how to study. Research demonstrates that learning is enhanced when…
Descriptors: Parent Role, Teacher Role, Study Habits, Notetaking
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Chandler, Jean – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
While it's acknowledged that some children demonstrate giftedness in leadership and social domains, it's still one area often overlooked by educators and parents. Literature on leadership has been geared mostly toward adults, not children. What does exist for student leadership has been typically organized around situations that focus on adapting…
Descriptors: Talent Development, Gifted, Student Leadership, Perspective Taking
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Goudelock, Jessa D. Luckey – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
Gifted African American students express characteristics of giftedness in significantly different ways when compared to their White counterparts. However, parents are not often aware how to recognize giftedness in their children, and teachers are unaware of the nuances in identifying and supporting gifted African American students. For parents of…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, African American Students, Student Characteristics, Talent Identification
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Sharma, Jyoti; Bagai, Shobha; Tyagi, Pankaj; Biswal, Bibhu – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
In India, parents play an important role in arranging and facilitating educational opportunities for their children, starting with the choice of school, arranging after-school classes, and sending them to various non-academic extracurricular classes. Most parents closely follow the academic performance of their children and willingly spend time…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Foreign Countries, Gifted, Parents
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Grubbs, Kathryn – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
The teenage years can be difficult, filled with questions, emotions, and decisions. For high-achieving adolescents who may experience asynchronous development or experience the world more intensely, these years can bring about intense emotions, feelings of isolation, or difficulty understanding the injustices of the world. Parents, may try to…
Descriptors: Adolescents, High Achievement, Adolescent Development, Child Rearing
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Sedillo, Paul James – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Gifted children are often empathetic, morally sensitive, and feel a responsibility toward others. As they become aware of the injustices in their surrounding communities, they may embark on a quest for justice for individuals who are oppressed, marginalized, or misunderstood. With Gay Pride Month in June bringing increased visibility and awareness…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Homosexuality, Sexual Orientation, Sexual Identity
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Carpenter, Ashley Y.; Hayden, Stacy M. – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Being a parent in the "gifted world" is challenging, especially when you don't have all the information. Whether your child has already been identified and is in a gifted program or you are looking for the school to better meet your child's needs, it's essential to know the various staff and administrators that can help you and your…
Descriptors: Parent Role, Gifted, Identification, Teaching Methods
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Koenderink, Tijl; Hovinga, Femke – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
"Falling out" of education is a rampant problem among gifted children and adults in the Netherlands. An educated guess is that one-third of the gifted adults are unhappy with where they are in their lives and careers. This article discusses ways in which parents or teachers can make a difference by seeing the whole gifted child, creating…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Academically Gifted, Dropout Prevention, Dropouts
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Fish, Leigh Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
The array of choices for early education can be overwhelming. Learning about the more prevalent approaches and their unique philosophies can help parents select a program that works for their precocious children. Some of these approaches include childcare/daycare, early entrance, Head Start, Montessori, Reggio Emilia, and Waldorf. The National…
Descriptors: Preschool Education, School Choice, Academically Gifted, Educational Methods
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Broome, Lauren – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
Academically gifted girls often see unrealized and unfulfilled potential as a result of societal pressures to make the choice between being smart and fitting in. Gifted girls face many social issues in their lives that impact their education and interests from a young age. Gender stereotypes may be perpetuated by teachers, who have been shown to…
Descriptors: Females, Academically Gifted, Social Influences, Social Attitudes
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Palevich, Megan O'Reilly; Honeck, Ellen – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
Schools are leveraging technology to enhance learning in the classroom at an exponential rate. According to "Education Week," public schools are spending nearly $3 billion per year on digital content and on average provide one computer for every five students. The typical classroom experience for many students now includes the use of…
Descriptors: Blended Learning, Educational Technology, Technology Uses in Education, Distance Education
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Harris, Kelly Lynne – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
The arts had a definite place in ancient Greek education and played an important part in children's physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth. Education was based on the development of the whole person. Gymnastics, drawing, music, and poetry were used to increase physical strength, moral character, and a sense of the aesthetic. Music,…
Descriptors: History, Art Education, Parent Role, Academically Gifted
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Luckey, Jessa; Grantham, Tarek – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
Upstander parents look, listen, and take action on behalf of their children, going the extra mile to ensure their children get the education they need and deserve. For gifted Black students, this attention and advocacy can be essential to help them reach their full potential and overcome the social and psychological barriers confronting them at…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, African American Students, Acceleration (Education), Parent Role
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