NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing 1 to 15 of 35 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Mohammed, Amra – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Twice-exceptional (2E) students are those who demonstrate a gift or talent in one or more areas and have a disability in another area. One identifying characteristic of 2E children is asynchronous development, or the display of unusual talent or maturity in one or more areas alongside a struggle to develop in other areas. Asynchronous development…
Descriptors: Bullying, Prevention, Children, Gifted
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Lutostanski, Scott – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Finding an enjoyable, exciting, and engaging activity for gifted students can be a challenging balancing act. While parents want their children to become active and involved, they may face setbacks as they try to find the right fit, with some gifted children grappling with poor fine and gross motor abilities. While a high percentage of gifted…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Athletics, Team Sports, Aquatic Sports
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Harris, Kelly Lynne – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
The arts had a definite place in ancient Greek education and played an important part in children's physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth. Education was based on the development of the whole person. Gymnastics, drawing, music, and poetry were used to increase physical strength, moral character, and a sense of the aesthetic. Music,…
Descriptors: History, Art Education, Parent Role, Academically Gifted
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Fisher, Carol – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Schools seem firmly rooted in the emphasis on computational mastery, and seldom seem to have time to develop other areas of mathematical thinking, such as real-world problem solving and the application of mathematical concepts. All too often, children seem to do well in math in the early grades because they easily memorize the facts and the…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Cognitive Development, Mathematical Concepts, Child Development
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Haydon, Kathryn P. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Sometimes it's not easy for highly creative children to "comply" with a regular curriculum, even at the preschool age. They are wired to explore, experiment, build, imagine, and create. If forced at a young age into a diet heavy on rote learning and directed work, they may struggle. It's not that these children can't do the work, it's…
Descriptors: Creativity, Parenting Skills, Child Development, Ability Identification
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Fugate, C. Matthew – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Unfortunately, there are many students that feel "stupid" in classrooms all around the country. They know they are gifted, but their ADHD and co-occurring conditions can make them feel isolated and alone. This is hard not only for the children, but for the parents who may feel powerless in helping their child know how special he or she…
Descriptors: Creativity, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Parent Education, Parenting Skills
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Gadzikowski, Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Helping daughters recognize science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in their daily lives, even in tasks like feeding the dog, baking a cake, or packing a suitcase, supports and encourages their STEM interests and abilities. Often young girls, even those who are very bright, aren't accustomed to thinking of themselves as being good at…
Descriptors: Females, Daughters, Parent Role, Academic Achievement
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Cramond, Bonnie – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
We teach our children manners, what to do in certain emergencies, and other life basics, but most of us do not intentionally teach our children about thinking strategies and creative problem solving. Perhaps this is the case because many of us have never formalized these processes within ourselves so that we feel capable of communicating them to…
Descriptors: Creative Thinking, Creativity, Child Development, Parent Role
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Creativity is best identified in children and adults by looking for behaviors such as flexibility, playfulness, curiosity, originality, intellectual risk-taking, and persistence in thoughts or actions. These creative behaviors occur at certain times and under certain conditions in everyone. But, they can also be either enhanced or severely…
Descriptors: Creativity, Child Rearing, Parenting Styles, Child Development
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kiewra, Kenneth A. – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
In his work, psychologist Benjamin Bloom concluded that almost all people can learn anything if provided with the right conditions, and that when a child commits to a talent area, parents must commit as well. Author Ken Kiewra studied real-world prodigies in various domains and shares his perspective on the conditions necessary for success and on…
Descriptors: Parent Role, Parents as Teachers, Talent Development, Child Development
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Parenting for High Potential, 2014
Many topics in the world of gifted are evergreen. Whether it be 1964 or 2014, they're still relevant. In this issue, "Parenting for High Potential" takes a peek into the archives to look at topics that have run in various March issues of PHP through the years. No matter where you are on the gifted journey, there's something here for…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Academically Gifted, Creativity, Young Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Smutny, Joan Franklin – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
Parents of gifted children play a powerful role in expanding their world and helping them discover what they love. When gifted children have impassioned, open-minded, and creative family members, they are free to discover what they love and who they are as people. For gifted learners, curiosity, passion, and interest are absolute essentials.…
Descriptors: Gifted, Parent Education, Family Environment, Problem Solving
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Boazman, Janette – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
This article focuses on the fact that very often the traditional parent-teacher conference process is missing the most important stake holder, the child. The author asks the reader to clear the traditional image of parent-teacher conferences from their mind and imagine a conference process and setting that has the potential to bring together…
Descriptors: Parent Teacher Conferences, Child Development, Models, Goal Orientation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Foster, Joanne – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
The author of this article implores parents to take the word "I" off the table. Instead of thinking "What can I do for my children?" consider, "What can they do for themselves?" How can one invoke children's independence and initiative? Start by inspiring them to investigate, imagine, and use their intellect.…
Descriptors: Child Development, Child Role, Interests, Cognitive Development
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Foster, Joanne – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
The old saying, "life is a journey" may sound cliched, but the words are nevertheless true. Children can learn a great deal from the travels and directions chosen by others, and especially from people whose life stories or experiences offer inspiration by virtue of their effort, perseverance, and acquired success. This article presents a…
Descriptors: Professional Personnel, Musicians, Athletes, Politics
Previous Page | Next Page ยป
Pages: 1  |  2  |  3