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Sandberg-Howe, Carol – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
What parent doesn't hope to give their children "the world," and at the earliest possible age start their journey in becoming responsible global citizens? Through play, children as young as 3 years old can assume active roles in learning important cultural-historical concepts. At home, parents can provide cultural information and…
Descriptors: Gifted, Young Children, Global Education, Learning Activities
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Gadzikowski, Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
In 2012, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) revised its position statement regarding the appropriate use of technology in early childhood classrooms. The increased accessibility of touch screens on tablets and smart phones led to this revision, which moves the conversation from the question of "When shall we…
Descriptors: Coding, Robotics, Young Children, Appropriate Technology
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Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…
Descriptors: Creativity, Creative Thinking, Creative Development, Parent Education
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Schader, Robin – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Whether or not it is conscious, parents, caregivers, and teachers are looking for indicators that a child is not "fitting in" with peers. In most cases, teachers and parents are looking for problems or learning difficulties that need to be addressed because the earlier a problem is discovered and diagnosed, the more likely an intervention or…
Descriptors: Gifted, Learning Problems, Caregivers, Young Children
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
"Developmentally appropriate practice" (DAP) is a term tossed about by practitioners as if everyone understands exactly what it means. DAP seems self-explanatory in that it requires educators to use only those strategies for teaching and discipline that are appropriate for the age of the child. The basic tenet of DAP rests on the assumed knowledge…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Teaching Methods, Student Needs, Child Development
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
The author was pondering the parent perspective of acceleration, and she realized that people are always hearing "ifs" and "buts" when discussing this topic. There are many "if" and "but" questions. In this article, the author focuses on the following four: (1) "If" my child is complaining of being bored in class, does that mean he or she needs to…
Descriptors: Acceleration (Education), Student Needs, Emotional Response, Academically Gifted
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Hertzog, Nancy B. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
Hakeem, Emily, Jose, and Latisha are all entering preschool in the fall. Their mothers are looking for the highest quality early childhood program they can find. Is there a guide for them to find a five-star program? Are all certified or accredited programs of equal quality? How do these parents and guardians know what defines quality in early…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Preschool Education, Young Children, Educational Quality