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Mofield, Emily; Peters, Megan Parker – Parenting for High Potential, 2019
The authors believe it's important to help gifted children recognize the emotions they experience. When gifted children are able to identify their emotions, they can ultimately gain control and regulate them. However, it's not always easy for children to identify or label how they are feeling on their own. They may need guidance to understand…
Descriptors: Children, Emotional Intelligence, Psychological Patterns, Academically Gifted
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Mohammed, Amra – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Twice-exceptional (2E) students are those who demonstrate a gift or talent in one or more areas and have a disability in another area. One identifying characteristic of 2E children is asynchronous development, or the display of unusual talent or maturity in one or more areas alongside a struggle to develop in other areas. Asynchronous development…
Descriptors: Bullying, Prevention, Children, Gifted
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Ragatz, Carolyn; Ragatz, Zach – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
Why encourage children to play board games? In the increasing disconnect of our digital lives, playing games provides a way to connect and relate with others on a human level. Strategy and role-playing games provide intellectual challenges and stretch creativity to keep the gifted mind engaged in solving problems. At the same time, the players…
Descriptors: Games, Role Playing, Gifted, Children
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Koenderink, Tijl; Hovinga, Femke – Parenting for High Potential, 2018
"Falling out" of education is a rampant problem among gifted children and adults in the Netherlands. An educated guess is that one-third of the gifted adults are unhappy with where they are in their lives and careers. This article discusses ways in which parents or teachers can make a difference by seeing the whole gifted child, creating…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Academically Gifted, Dropout Prevention, Dropouts
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Yamada, Sylvia – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Meeting the needs of gifted students is challenging even in traditional contexts and settings. Well-known issues include a limited choice of schools, underrepresentation of certain populations, and, often, the lack of facilities and support for high-ability students. Imagine, then, the further complexities of high-ability Third Culture Kids (TCKs)…
Descriptors: Gifted, School Choice, Student Mobility, Cultural Influences
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Smutny, Joan Franklin – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
One of the most common questions the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) receives from parents is, "How should I advocate for my child in the classroom?" Dr. Joan Smutny first tackled this topic for "Parenting for High Potential" in 2002, but her practical, step-by-step approach is still very applicable today. Some…
Descriptors: Gifted, Children, Parent School Relationship, Advocacy
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Wilson, Hope E.; Gaa, John – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
Many parents are in search of ways to best encourage their gifted children in the arts. As arts programs receive less financial and administrative support from the public school systems, parents are seeking additional resources. This article will provide a beginning point for parents to support artistic development for gifted children, based upon…
Descriptors: Parenting Styles, Child Rearing, Art Education, Art Activities
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Dudley, John; Karnes, Frances A. – Parenting for High Potential, 2011
Divorce is often a contentious process with multiple issues to decide, especially in cases in which there are children involved. Divorce raises several legal issues when considering the well-being of children, including those who are gifted. In this article, the authors discuss these issues which include school choice, child support, and custody…
Descriptors: Divorce, Legal Responsibility, Academically Gifted, School Choice