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Showing 1 to 15 of 41 results Save | Export
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VanTassel-Baska, Joyce; MacFarlane, Bronwyn; Baska, Ariel – Parenting for High Potential, 2017
The need for language programs in schools is strong among gifted students, who need the depth and complexity provided by a world language program. Gifted students can benefit from exposure to global cultures, a deepened emphasis on conceptual learning, and an appreciation of issues that shape today's world. Second language learning carries high…
Descriptors: Second Language Learning, Academically Gifted, Interdisciplinary Approach, Student Characteristics
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Welch, Carolyn E. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in December 2015 is an exciting development for parents, teachers, school leaders, and others who believe U.S. schools should meet the needs of high-ability students. The ESSA revised and reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), previously known as the No Child…
Descriptors: Child Advocacy, Educational Legislation, Special Needs Students, Gifted
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Olmstead, Gwen – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
The author shares that her journey with gifted homeschooling was filled with folly and a slow learning curve. By sharing some of the struggles and insights she faced, the author hopes others will benefit or find solace in knowing they are not alone when their square peg children do not fit into round holes. In this article the author discusses:…
Descriptors: Home Schooling, Gifted, Mothers, Parent Attitudes
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Hildebrandt, Martha – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
Parents and grandparents are always looking for new ways to engage their kids and grandkids in meaningful, enriching educational activities. While there is evidence that playing games can increase numerical fluency, research also shows that parental involvement outside of school is one of the best predictors of student achievement and that games…
Descriptors: Learning Activities, Creative Development, Mathematics Activities, Parents as Teachers
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Reeves, Diana – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
Fear of failure starts early in life, and is common among high achievers. From their earliest years, many gifted children are successful in almost everything they try because they are under challenged, and paradoxically, become failure-avoidant. When parents always encourage their children to get the highest grade or to be "the best,"…
Descriptors: Fear, Failure, Parent Education, Parenting Styles
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Boazman, Janette – Parenting for High Potential, 2014
This article focuses on the fact that very often the traditional parent-teacher conference process is missing the most important stake holder, the child. The author asks the reader to clear the traditional image of parent-teacher conferences from their mind and imagine a conference process and setting that has the potential to bring together…
Descriptors: Parent Teacher Conferences, Child Development, Models, Goal Orientation
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Lindbom-Cho, Desiree R. – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
"I'm bored!" It is the refrain dreaded by all parents. By the time winter weather has come and gone, all kids, not just gifted ones, are ready for a change of scenery and/or a change in routine. What is an overworked parent plagued by spring fever him- or herself to do? Finding the right distraction for a gifted child can prove…
Descriptors: Gifted, Academically Gifted, Educational Resources, Motivation Techniques
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McGee, Christy D. – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
While spending quite a bit of time in schools observing student teachers, the author of this article began to think about the way gifted children and their parents view school because the children do not seem to feel safe in their schools. The author observed that many of these children are very bright and are bored or frustrated, yet they do not…
Descriptors: Gifted, Academically Gifted, Teacher Student Relationship, Parent Child Relationship
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Tassell, Janet; Maxwell, Margaret; Stobaugh, Rebecca – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
Gifted children crave meaning through learning experiences, and they are naturally inquisitive. This article provides a teaching framework that parents can adapt for use with gifted children to help facilitate STEM knowledge and skills. The CReaTE Framework, adapted from an evolving lesson plan framework, can promote learning in a nontraditional,…
Descriptors: STEM Education, Learning Experience, Gifted, Parent Education
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Davis, Joy Lawson – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
An effective and meaningful classroom for high-ability students is one in which teaching and learning is focused on meeting students' intellectual, academic, and psychosocial needs using specific strategies to impact their learning today as they prepare for tomorrow. As parents become more engaged with teachers, it also is important for them…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, High Achievement, Educational Environment, Student Needs
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Gavin, M. Katherine; Firmender, Janine M.; Casa, Tutita M. – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
What is math talent? Ten different educators will most likely provide 10 different answers. Researchers state that one reason mathematical talent is difficult to describe involves the different ways children manifest math talent. Children can display math talent in three different ways: (a) those who reason abstractly and have an "algebraic…
Descriptors: Talent Development, Talent Identification, Mathematical Aptitude, Children
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Shive, Lauren – Parenting for High Potential, 2013
Although ADHD may be overdiagnosed in gifted children, ADHD and other disabilities can also be overlooked in this population. Young children in particular may be able to compensate for their disabilities to the point where these weaknesses are effectively masked by their giftedness, delaying a diagnosis and intervention. Such twice-exceptional…
Descriptors: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Children, Academically Gifted, Disability Identification
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Beasley, Jennifer G. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
The Curriculum Studies Network focuses on promoting and creating high-quality curriculum to meet the needs of academically advanced learners. Staff at Curriculum Studies Network are proud of the collaboration they promote among educators, but in order for high-quality curriculum to continue to be the standard in the field, they realize the…
Descriptors: Advanced Students, Curriculum Development, Parent Role, Parent School Relationship
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Willis, Mariam – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Best Practices, Parent Associations, Advocacy
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Smutny, Joan F. – Parenting for High Potential, 2012
For many young gifted English Language Learners (ELLs), going to an American school is like a trip to Mars. Everything and everyone looks strange. Many ELLs feel unsure of their abilities when they discover that their proficiency in English can sometimes hinder achievement. They wonder what the other kids think of their speech, their accents,…
Descriptors: Gifted, English (Second Language), Creativity, Second Language Learning
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