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Yamada, Naomi C. F. – Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, 2015
In both China and in the United States, policies of "positive discrimination" were originally intended to lessen educational and economic inequalities, and to provide equal opportunities. As with affirmative action in the American context, China's "preferential policies" are broad-reaching, but are best known for taking ethnic…
Descriptors: Educational Policy, Neoliberalism, Educational Change, Foreign Countries
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Shumar, Wesley – Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, 2014
This summary article situates the articles in this collection within the historical unfolding of the commodification and neoliberalisation of higher education. From the 1970s to the present, the article suggests that commodification and neoliberalisation are two social forces that in many nations are difficult to disentangle. It is important to…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Neoliberalism, Commercialization, Educational Change
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Hose, Linda; Ford, E. J. – Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, 2014
Based on personal experiences garnered through years of adjunct instruction, the authors explore the challenges associated with working in academia without the guarantees of a long-term contract or tenure. Further, adjuncts are desperate to accept any position that is remunerative and this willingness undermines contract negotiation leverage of…
Descriptors: Adjunct Faculty, Ethnography, Neoliberalism, Commercialization
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LeCompte, Margaret D. – Learning and Teaching: The International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, 2014
This article describes how different constituencies in a major research university tried to initiate change despite disagreements over common goals, norms and principles. The context was a culture war. The university administration wanted to impose a corporatising and privatising philosophy which it felt was crucial to preserving the university's…
Descriptors: Research Universities, College Faculty, College Administration, Governance