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Showing 166 to 180 of 192 results Save | Export
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O'Grady, William; Yamashita, Yoshie; Cho, Sookeun – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
Languages can differ in fundamental ways with respect to the syntax of sentences with a "missing" direct object. Whereas Japanese and Korean permit null direct objects that are licensed under general discourse conditions (the recoverability of the referent from context) without regard for choice of verb, object ellipsis in English obeys lexical…
Descriptors: Verbs, Syntax, English, Language Acquisition
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Kehoe, Margaret; Hilaire-Debove, Geraldine; Demuth, Katherine; Lleo, Conxita – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
Consonant-glide-vowel (CGV) sequences are represented differently across languages. In some languages, the CG sequence is represented as a branching onset; in other languages, the GV sequence is represented as a rising diphthong. Given variable syllabification across languages, this study examines how young children represent CGV sequences. In…
Descriptors: Speech Communication, Error Patterns, Vowels, French
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Grinstead, John; Cantu-Sanchez, Myriam; Flores-Avalos, Blanca – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
In this study, we investigate whether specific language impairment (SLI) manifests itself grammatically in the same way in Spanish and English with respect to nominal plural marking. English-speaking children with SLI are very proficient at marking plural on nouns. Spanish has two main nominal plural allomorphs: /s/ and /es/. The /es/ allomorph…
Descriptors: Control Groups, Speech Communication, Nouns, Morphemes
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Pirvulescu, Mihaela; Belzil, Isabelle – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
Much developmental work has been devoted to the acquisition of object clitics in French. There is a consensus that in early grammar, children omit object clitics in contexts where an adult would not. Several analyses have been put forth, among which, one proposing a close link between the omission of object clitics and the presence of past…
Descriptors: Verbs, Foreign Countries, French, Linguistic Theory
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Blom, Elma – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
This article focuses on the meaning of nonfinite clauses ("root infinitives") in Dutch and English child language. I present experimental and naturalistic data confirming the claim that Dutch root infinitives are more often modal than English root infinitives. This cross-linguistic difference is significantly smaller than previously assumed,…
Descriptors: Indo European Languages, English, Vocabulary Development, Verbs
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Matsuo, Ayumi – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
This article describes how English and Japanese children interpret empty categories in Verb Phrase Ellipsis contexts as in (1):(1) The penguin [sat on his chair] and the robot did [delta], too. To obtain an adultlike interpretation of (1), English children have to do two things. First, they need to find a suitable antecedent for the empty verb…
Descriptors: Verbs, Semantics, Language Patterns, Japanese
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Anderson, Bruce – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
In this article I provide evidence that despite frequently cited differences between child first language (L1) and adult second language (L2) speakers in overt behavior (performance) during grammatical development, the nature, source, and limits of implicit knowledge (competence) in native and second language grammars are equivalent (i.e., they…
Descriptors: Epistemology, Syntax, Nouns, French
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Barlow, Jessica A. – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
In this article, I present a longitudinal study of a child's (male, aged 3;0-3;4) acquisition of intervocalic consonants characterized within the framework of Optimality Theory (OT). At Stage I, the child presents with unusual error patterns, weakening and labial substitution, and shows evidence of phonologically opaque surface forms. These…
Descriptors: Error Patterns, Phonology, Language Acquisition, Case Studies
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Bohnacker, Ute – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
This article investigates the L2 acquisition of clausal syntax in postpuberty learners of German and Swedish regarding V2, VP headedness, and verb particle constructions. The learner data are tested against L2 theories according to which lower structural projections (VP) are acquired before higher functional projections (IP, CP), VP syntax is…
Descriptors: Verbs, Swedish, Native Speakers, German
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Hyams, Nina – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
This paper focuses on the temporal and modal meanings associated with root infinitives (RIs) and other non-finite clauses in several typologically diverse languages--English, Russian, Greek and Dutch. I discuss the role that event structure, aspect, and modality play in the interpretation of these clauses. The basic hypothesis is that in the…
Descriptors: Language Patterns, English, Russian, Indo European Languages
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Legate, Julie Anne; Yang, Charles – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
In this article, we propose that the Root Infinitive (RI) phenomenon in child language is best viewed and explained as the interaction between morphological learning and syntactic development. We make the following specific suggestions: The optionality in RI reflects the presence of a grammar such as Chinese which does not manifest tense marking.…
Descriptors: Linguistic Theory, French, Child Language, Language Acquisition
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Friedmann, Na'ama – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
SV sentences with unaccusative verbs like "The leaf fell" involve movement from object to subject position. This line of studies tested whether young children can produce this movement and whether they represent SV sentences with unaccusatives as derived by movement. In Hebrew, unaccusatives appear in both SV and VS orders. This optionality allows…
Descriptors: Semitic Languages, Sentence Structure, Speech, Grammar
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Pouscoulous, Nausicaa; Noveck, Ira A.; Politzer, Guy; Bastide, Anne – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
Much developmental work has been devoted to "scalar implicatures." These are implicitly communicated propositions linked to relatively weak terms (consider how "Some" pragmatically implies "Not all") that are more likely to be carried out by adults than by children. Children tend to retain the linguistically encoded…
Descriptors: Language Processing, French, Language Research, Language Acquisition
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Green, Lisa; Roeper, Thomas – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2007
This article considers the comprehension of tense-aspect markers remote past BIN and habitual be by 3- to 5-year-old developing African American English (AAE)-speaking children and their Southwest Louisiana Vernacular English (SwLVE)-speaking peers. Overall both groups of children associated BIN with the distant past; however, the AAE-speaking…
Descriptors: North American English, Syntax, Semantics, Indigenous Knowledge
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Gruter, Theres – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2006
The nature of the initial state in second-language (L2) acquisition is a much debated but still unresolved issue, due in part to the empirical problem of obtaining production data from L2 learners at very early stages in development. In an attempt to circumvent this problem, this article presents evidence from a comprehension-based experiment…
Descriptors: German, Interlanguage, Second Language Learning, Task Analysis
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