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Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2010
In English the nonfinite form is simply a bare verb, but in languages with a morphological distinction it usually takes the form of an infinitive. During the relevant stage the child, unlike an adult, sometimes uses an infinitive as the main verb of a root clause. Luigi Rizzi and certain other researchers therefore favor the term "root…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Young Children, Verbs, Syntax
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Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2009
Passives has been the focus of much research in language acquisition since the 1970s. It has been clear from this research that young children seldom produce passives spontaneously, particularly "long" or "full" passives with a by-phrase; and they usually perform poorly on experimental tests of the comprehension of passives, especially passives of…
Descriptors: Language Research, Verbs, Performance Factors, Language Acquisition
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Lillo-Martin, Diane; Snyder, William – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
This article presents the authors' comments on Nina Hyams' article, "The Acquisition of Inflection: A Parameter Setting Approach" (AIPSA). The article began as a 1986 presentation at the Boston University Conference on Language Development (BUCLD). Parts of it were also presented at the 4th Eastern States Conference on Linguistics (ESCOL) in 1987…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Verbs, Morphemes, Children
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Hyams, Nina – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
First written in 1986, prior to the many findings concerning the optionality of finiteness and the root infinitive phenomenon, this article attempts to extend the parameter-setting model of grammatical development to the acquisition of inflectional morphology. I propose that the Stem Parameter, which states that a stem is/is not a well-formed word…
Descriptors: Morphemes, Grammar, Language Acquisition, Morphology (Languages)
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Tamburelli, Marco – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
This article argues for a theory of lexical acquisition that takes overgeneralization in monolinguals and syntactic transfer effects in bilinguals to be manifestations of the same underlying mechanism. The theory views both overgeneralization and transfer as epiphenomena of an updating system which spreads newly acquired information across…
Descriptors: Models, Transfer of Training, Language Acquisition, Bilingualism
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Unsworth, Sharon; Gualmini, Andrea; Helder, Christina – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2008
Previous research suggests that children's behavior with respect to the interpretation of indefinite objects in negative sentences may differ depending on the target language: whereas young English-speaking children tend to select a surface scope interpretation (e.g., Musolino (1998)), young Dutch-speaking children consistently prefer an inverse…
Descriptors: Sentences, Speech Communication, Grammar, Indo European Languages
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Geurts, Bart – Language Acquisition: A Journal of Developmental Linguistics, 2003
It has been known for several decades that young children have difficulties with universal sentences. In this article, I present an analysis of the main errors that have been reported in the literature. My proposal is based on an old idea, namely, that children's errors are caused by a noncanonical mapping from syntactic form to semantic…
Descriptors: Semantics, Sentences, Context Effect, Language Universals