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ERIC Number: EJ1088832
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2014-Mar
Pages: 13
Abstractor: ERIC
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1525-1810
Simple Strategies for Reflecting on and Responding to Common Criticisms of PBIS
Bruhn, Allison; Gorsh, Jay; Hannan, Chloe; Hirsch, Shanna Eisner
Journal of Special Education Leadership, v27 n1 p13-25 Mar 2014
Schools implementing Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) are often confronted with concerns from a variety of educational stakeholders about school climate, teaching behavioral expectations, the role of reinforcement, and labeling students. Administrators should be prepared to respond to these concerns with theoretical and empirical evidence. And, they need tools for faculty to reflect upon and improve PBIS implementation. Effective PBIS implementation involves: (1) positive social interactions between students, teachers, and administrators; (2) behavioral expectations taught in a socially- and age-appropriate way; (3) a variety of methods for reinforcing students for demonstrating positive behavior, and (4) teams using fidelity and student-level data to drive instructional decisions. PBIS has its fair share of critics including educational leaders who have vocalized opposition to components of the PBIS framework and the federal government's involvement with the National Technical Assistance Center for PBIS, as well as parents who have expressed concerns. To help administrators, as well as promote understanding amongst educational stakeholders, the authors provide a historical framework of schoolwide discipline, summarize evidence of PBIS resulting in improved school outcomes, and most importantly, provide resources and recommendations that address common criticisms and support implementation. The goal of this paper is not to equip administrators and teachers with simple strategies and resources that will help them to reflect on their current practices and improve implementation. By making sure PBIS is implemented accurately, consistently, and ethically according to practices described in the research base; the authors hope that administrators and teachers will find themselves better prepared to respond to stakeholders' criticisms.
Council of Administrators of Special Education. Fort Valley State University, 1005 State University Drive, Fort Valley, GA 31030. Tel: 478-825-7667; Fax: 478-825-7811; Web site: http://www.casecec.org
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: Middle Schools; Secondary Education; Junior High Schools
Audience: Administrators; Teachers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A