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McCloskey, George – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2017
This commentary will take an historical perspective on the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement (KTEA) error analysis, discussing where it started, where it is today, and where it may be headed in the future. In addition, the commentary will compare and contrast the KTEA error analysis procedures that are rooted in psychometric methodology and…
Descriptors: Achievement Tests, Error Patterns, Comparative Analysis, Psychometrics
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Greathouse, Dan; Shaughnessy, Michael F. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2016
Whenever a major intelligence or achievement test is revised, there is always renewed interest in the underlying structure of the test as well as a renewed interest in the scoring, administration, and interpretation changes. In this interview, Amy Gabel discusses the most recent revision of the "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fifth…
Descriptors: Children, Intelligence Tests, Test Use, Test Validity
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Johnson, Alyce O. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2015
The "Parenting Stress Index, Fourth Edition" (PSI-4) is a 120-item measure used to explore parental stress levels considering a parent's relationship with one of his or her children between the ages of 1 month and 12 years. The main purpose of the test is to define these stress levels and from where they originate in order to identify…
Descriptors: Anxiety, Measures (Individuals), Parents, Child Rearing
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Harrison, Allyson G.; Holmes, Alana; Silvestri, Robert; Armstrong, Irene T. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2015
Miller et al. have challenged the findings of our two previous studies, based largely on the assumption that our findings are biased due to the clinical sample used. However, they fail to address the primary tenet of our studies, namely, that clinicians will obtain different scores on the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV (WAIS-IV) depending on…
Descriptors: Intelligence Tests, Adults, Test Norms, Scores
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Wright, Peter W. D.; Hale, James B.; Backenson, Erica M.; Eusebio, Eleazar C.; Dixon, Shauna G. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2013
In this issue, Professor Perry Zirkel argues that the points presented in the Dixon, Eusebio, Turton, Wright, and Hale treatise of the Forest Grove School District v. T.A. Supreme Court case confuses "legal requirements with professional norms." Although we appreciate Zirkel's acknowledgment that our position reflects the professional…
Descriptors: Court Litigation, Disability Identification, Special Education, Federal Regulation
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Canivez, Gary L.; Kush, Joseph C. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2013
Weiss, Keith, Zhu, and Chen (2013a) and Weiss, Keith, Zhu, and Chen (2013b), this issue, report examinations of the factor structure of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) and Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV), respectively; comparing Wechsler Hierarchical Model (W-HM) and…
Descriptors: Intelligence Tests, Factor Structure, Comparative Analysis, Arithmetic
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Weiss, Lawrence G.; Keith, Timothy Z.; Zhu, Jianjun; Chen, Hsinyi – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2013
This discussion article addresses issues related to expansion of the Wechsler model from four to five factors; multiple broad CHC abilities measured by the Arithmetic subtest; advantages and disadvantages of including complex tasks requiring integration of multiple broad abilities when measuring intelligence; limitations of factor analysis, which…
Descriptors: Measures (Individuals), Intelligence Tests, Brain Hemisphere Functions, Neurological Organization
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Erwin, Jesse O.; Worrell, Frank C. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2012
Several scholars have asserted that the underrepresentation of minority students in gifted and talented education (GATE) programs is the result of biased assessment practices. However, an examination of the psychometric properties of scores on cognitive ability, achievement tests, and rating scales do not support these claims. We contend that the…
Descriptors: Achievement Gap, Group Membership, Summer Programs, Academically Gifted
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Yang, Yanyun; Green, Samuel B. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2011
Coefficient alpha is almost universally applied to assess reliability of scales in psychology. We argue that researchers should consider alternatives to coefficient alpha. Our preference is for structural equation modeling (SEM) estimates of reliability because they are informative and allow for an empirical evaluation of the assumptions…
Descriptors: Structural Equation Models, Reliability, Measures (Individuals)
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Dixon, Shauna G.; Eusebio, Eleazar C.; Turton, William J.; Wright, Peter W. D.; Hale, James B. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2011
The 2009 "Forest Grove School District v. T.A." United States Supreme Court case could have significant implications for school psychology practice. The Court ruled that the parents of a student with a disability were entitled to private school tuition reimbursement even though T.A. had not been identified with a disability or previously…
Descriptors: Court Litigation, School Psychology, Disabilities, Federal Legislation
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Reynolds, Cecil R.; Niland, John; Wright, John E.; Rosenn, Michal – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2010
The Flynn Effect is a well documented phenomenon demonstrating score increases on IQ measures over time that average about 0.3 points per year. Normative adjustments to scores derived from IQ measures normed more than a year or so prior to the time of testing an individual have become controversial in several settings but especially so in matters…
Descriptors: Intelligence Tests, Age Differences, Change, Test Norms
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Sternberg, Robert J. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2010
The Flynn effect probably has multiple causes, and the target essays in this issue have expanded the number of possible causes behind it. This essay deals primarily with a different question: How important is IQ in the current world and should it perhaps be understood also in conjunction with a consideration of some kind of ethical intelligence?
Descriptors: Intelligence Quotient, Intelligence Tests, Age Differences, Change
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Kaufman, Alan S. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2010
In the first article of this special issue of the "Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment", I critiqued Flynn's theoretical explanation of the Flynn effect because he depended too heavily on an apparently huge generational gain on the WISC Similarities subtest; I claimed he was comparing apples with oranges because that subtest changed too much…
Descriptors: Intelligence Tests, Age Differences, Change, Test Norms
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Kaufman, Alan S. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2010
Flynn wrote a book devoted to the Flynn effect, featuring his theoretical explanation of why the intelligence of worldwide populations has apparently increased from generation to generation. The essence of his theorizing is that because of the societal impact of scientific technology, people of today are much more guided by abstract, rather than…
Descriptors: Intelligence Tests, Age Differences, Change, Test Norms
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Fletcher, Jack M.; Stuebing, Karla K.; Hughes, Lisa C. – Journal of Psychoeducational Assessment, 2010
IQ test scores should be corrected for high stakes decisions that employ these assessments, including capital offense cases. If scores are not corrected, then diagnostic standards must change with each generation. Arguments against corrections, based on standards of practice, information present and absent in test manuals, and related issues,…
Descriptors: Testing, Mental Retardation, Validity, Intelligence Quotient
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