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Heath, Michele L. – Journal of Management Education, 2019
"Faculty Misstatements in Management Education and their Consequences" is a thought-provoking article that draws attention to what information is being disseminated in business schools. The article argues that faculty communicate misinformation about the economic model and what matters in life. This rejoinder addresses the notion that…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Business Administration Education, Deception, Misconceptions
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Fellenz, Martin R. – Journal of Management Education, 2019
Giacalone and Promislo's essay on the menace of misinformation usefully discusses problems arising from faculty misstatements. However, it falls short of identifying a deeper malaise in management education where a lack of critical and reflexive consideration of the nature of truth and the use of empirical facts; of the role of values and…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Business Administration Education, Deception, Misconceptions
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Charlier, Steven D.; Hoell, Robert C.; Sproul, Curtis R.; Stewart, Steven A. – Journal of Management Education, 2019
In this rejoinder, we provide a different perspective on the positions put forth by Giacalone and Promislo as they relate to (1) the claims of the pervasiveness of "misinformation" that is communicated by management faculty and (2) the proposition that management educators should teach in a nonideological fashion. Our position on these…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Business Administration Education, Deception, Misconceptions
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Brahm, Taiga; Jenert, Tobias – Journal of Management Education, 2019
In their thought-provoking article, Giacalone and Promislo point to some problematic ideas in management education such as the adoration of materialism and competition or the notion of the economic model as a natural law. But do students really develop such ideas because they were misinformed by their teachers? Misinformation implies that what is…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Business Administration Education, Deception, Misconceptions
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Lewis, Vance Johnson – Journal of Management Education, 2019
The notion that we as business faculty are misleading students is on the surface shocking but in deeper thought not misguided. While Giacalone and Promislo present a compelling argument for how and why business schools do not present the full picture to students, their discussion lacks in embracing the situations faced by all students. In this…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Business Administration Education, Deception, Misconceptions
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Arbaugh, J. Ben – Journal of Management Education, 2018
Herein, Ben Arbaugh discusses his article, "Virtual Classroom Characteristics and Student Satisfaction in Internet-Based MBA Courses," not only in terms of its impact on his career and studies of online delivery in business schools but also in terms how it is and can be representative of what business and management education (BME)…
Descriptors: Student Attitudes, Masters Programs, Business Administration Education, Computer Simulation
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Butler, Deborah – Journal of Management Education, 2017
Is it my job to get to know each student "as a person"? This is the focus of Chory and Offstein's (2016) thoughtful essay. This article examines the many ways that changes in education over recent decades have affected core assumptions around the relationships faculty are expected to have with students. Chory and Offstein (2016) explore…
Descriptors: Teacher Student Relationship, Higher Education, College Students, College Faculty
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Starbuck, William H. – Journal of Management Education, 2017
The article, "Your Professor Will Know You as a Person" (Chory & Offstein, 2016) brings two groups of thoughts to the author's mind. First, postsecondary education is changing in ways that are forcing higher education institutions to reformulate their strategies. These changes are likely to increase the heterogeneity of universities,…
Descriptors: Teacher Student Relationship, Higher Education, College Students, College Faculty
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Stark, John B. – Journal of Management Education, 2017
As an administrator, one who still considers himself to be "faculty" at the core, the author can appreciate the position of Chory & Offstein (2016) in their essay, and understand the intent is to create dialog. In service to that goal, the author thinks we need to place this discussion within the "lived reality" of most…
Descriptors: Learner Engagement, Teacher Student Relationship, Higher Education, College Students
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Burke-Smalley, Lisa A. – Journal of Management Education, 2017
Bacon and Stewart (2016) argued that assurance of learning efforts in most business schools is largely futile--a stance held by many faculty members, for a variety of reasons. They provided detailed evidence that most schools' data collection efforts for assessment, particularly in graduate or niche programs, suffers from insufficient statistical…
Descriptors: Business Schools, Educational Assessment, Testing Problems, Educational Research
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Shavelson, Richard J. – Journal of Management Education, 2017
In their essay, "Why Assessment Will Never Work...," Bacon and Stewart (2016) recommend that instead of carrying out the expensive process of experimenting themselves, many business schools would get a bigger bang for their buck if they used "published pedagogical studies that use direct measures of learning with sufficient…
Descriptors: Business Schools, Educational Assessment, Statistical Analysis, Statistical Significance
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Nesteruk, Jeffrey – Journal of Management Education, 2017
The question of how to assess the value of what professors do should engage all. Within this context, Donald R. Bacon and Kim A. Stewart's (2016) essay, "Why Assessment Will Never Work at Many Business Schools," is a laudable effort with important insights. In this rejoinder, Nesteruk, for the most part, is in substantial agreement with…
Descriptors: Business Schools, Educational Assessment, Educational Research, Research Utilization
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Gallos, Joan V. – Journal of Management Education, 2017
Having received the 2017 "Lasting Impact Award" for "Women's Experiences and Ways of Knowing: Implications for Teaching and Learning in the Organizational Behavior Classroom," author Joan V. Gallos describes the experience as "delightfully sweet and timely." The article was written early in her academic career at…
Descriptors: Classroom Techniques, Cognitive Style, Educational Strategies, Females
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Williams-Pierce, Caroline – Journal of Management Education, 2016
This commentary serves as an introduction to multiple scholarly fields about the value of digital media for providing contexts for and provoking learning. The author proposes that rather than considering a dichotomy between reading physical books and reading digital media, as encouraged by Cavanaugh et al. (2015), instead consider a scale of sorts…
Descriptors: Cognitive Development, Student Development, Neurosciences, Reader Response
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Mannheimer, Steve – Journal of Management Education, 2016
The author of this thought-provoking article joins an impressive cohort of current commentators and scholars united in their concern over the state of the art of reading. Mostly, they are concerned with the sustained, silent, generally solitary process of reading in which the reader is deeply focused on and immersed in the text. Their fear is that…
Descriptors: Neurosciences, Cognitive Development, Reading Processes, Macroeconomics
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