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McArthur, Laura; Rosenberg, Rachel I.; Grady, Frances M.; Howard, Alan B. – Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences: From Research to Practice, 2002
A study assessed dietary compliance among 192 college students. Students who lived on campus, younger students, females, students who ate out infrequently, and students who rarely/never consumed high-fat foods showed the lowest compliance with the recommended number of daily servings from all food groups. (Contains 36 references.) (JOW)
Descriptors: College Students, Eating Habits, Higher Education, Nutrition
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Abusabha, Rayane; Achterberg, Cheryl; McKenzie, Jeannie; Torres, Deanna – Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences: From Research to Practice, 1998
Data from 1,548 Women, Infants, Children clients showed that 93% found nutrition education valuable. A process-oriented evaluation of 494 clients using a skills inventory, and 513 using self-efficacy measures, identified topics they knew most and least about. Clients in facilitated discussion groups scored highest in self-efficacy compared with…
Descriptors: Adult Education, Discussion Groups, Eating Habits, Nutrition Instruction
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Oscarson, Renee A.; Branum, Judy – Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences: From Research to Practice, 1999
Parents of 27 preschoolers completed pretests and 14 completed posttests assessing nutrition knowledge, food purchases, and children's food intake. Children who received snacks and soybean-related instruction found both soy and nonsoy snacks acceptable, compared to those who did not receive instruction. Home eating habits did not change. (SK)
Descriptors: Dietetics, Eating Habits, Nutrition Instruction, Parent Participation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Driskell, Judy A. – Journal of Family and Consumer Sciences: From Research to Practice, 1999
Vitamin and mineral supplements were taken by 67% of 88 women and 52% of 88 men surveyed. Reasons included disease prevention and inadequate diet. Women took calcium and iron more frequently. Those who did not take them cited adequate diet and expense. Influence of advertising on supplement use was a concern. (SK)
Descriptors: Advertising, Beliefs, Eating Habits, Graduate Students