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Showing 1 to 15 of 1,999 results Save | Export
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van der Kooij, Katinka; Smeets, Jeroen B. J. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Recently it has been shown that rewarded variability can be used to adapt visuomotor behavior. However, its relevance seems limited because adaptation to binary rewards has been demonstrated only when the same movement is repeated throughout the experiment. We therefore investigated whether the adaptation is action-specific and whether the amount…
Descriptors: Rewards, Psychomotor Skills, Visual Stimuli, Feedback (Response)
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Thalmann, Mirko; Souza, Alessandra S.; Oberauer, Klaus – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Chunking is the recoding of smaller units of information into larger, familiar units. Chunking is often assumed to help bypassing the limited capacity of working memory (WM). We investigate how chunks are used in WM tasks, addressing three questions: (a) Does chunking reduce the load on WM? Across four experiments chunking benefits were found not…
Descriptors: Short Term Memory, Cognitive Processes, Recall (Psychology), Long Term Memory
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Peterson, Dwight J.; Decker, Reed; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
A fundamental question for human memory research relates to the role of attention during the binding of distinct components into an integrated representation. A number of important differences exist between the working memory and episodic memory literature in terms of methodological implementation and empirical outcomes. For instance, episodic…
Descriptors: Role, Attention, Repetition, Short Term Memory
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Miyatsu, Toshiya; Gouravajhala, Reshma; Nosofsky, Robert M.; McDaniel, Mark A. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Learning naturalistic categories, which tend to have fuzzy boundaries and vary on many dimensions, can often be harder than learning well defined categories. One method for facilitating the category learning of naturalistic stimuli may be to provide explicit feature descriptions that highlight the characteristic features of each category. Although…
Descriptors: Undergraduate Students, Feedback (Response), Experiments, Generalization
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Staub, Adrian; Goddard, Kirk – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
A word's predictability, as measured by its cloze probability, has a robust influence on the time a reader's eyes spend on the word, with more predictable words receiving shorter fixations. However, several previous studies using the boundary paradigm have found no apparent effect of predictability on early reading time measures when the reader…
Descriptors: Prediction, Probability, Eye Movements, Reading
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Maslowski, Merel; Meyer, Antje S.; Bosker, Hans Rutger – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Listeners are known to track statistical regularities in speech. Yet, which temporal cues are encoded is unclear. This study tested effects of talker-specific habitual speech rate and talker-independent average speech rate (heard over a longer period of time) on the perception of the temporal Dutch vowel contrast /?/-/a:/. First, Experiment 1…
Descriptors: Speech, Speech Habits, Auditory Perception, Indo European Languages
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Schuster, Swetlana; Lahiri, Aditi – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
On the evidence of four lexical-decision tasks in German, we examine speakers' sensitivity to internal morphological composition and abstract morphological rules during the processing of derived words, real and novel. In a lexical-decision task with delayed priming, speakers were presented with two-step derived nouns such as "Heilung…
Descriptors: German, Morphology (Languages), Decision Making, Task Analysis
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Kinoshita, Sachiko; Schubert, Teresa; Verdonschot, Rinus G. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
It is well-established that allographs like the uppercase and lowercase forms of the Roman alphabet (e.g., a and A) map onto the same "abstract letter identity," orthographic representations that are independent of the visual form. Consistent with this, in the allograph match task ("Are 'a' and 'A' the same letter?"), priming…
Descriptors: Japanese, Alphabets, Priming, Word Recognition
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Palmer, Shekeila D.; Hutson, James; White, Laurence; Mattys, Sven L. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
The hypothesis that known words can serve as anchors for discovering new words in connected speech has computational and empirical support. However, evidence for how the bootstrapping effect of known words interacts with other mechanisms of lexical acquisition, such as statistical learning, is incomplete. In 3 experiments, we investigated the…
Descriptors: Suprasegmentals, Vocabulary Development, Lexicology, Word Recognition
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Shao, Zeshu; van Paridon, Jeroen; Poletiek, Fenna; Meyer, Antje S. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
There is mounting evidence that the ease of producing and understanding language depends not only on the frequencies of individual words but also on the frequencies of word combinations. However, in two picture description experiments, Janssen and Barber (2012) found that French and Spanish speakers' speech onset latencies for short phrases…
Descriptors: Phrase Structure, Nouns, Word Frequency, Indo European Languages
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St-Louis, Marie-Ève; Hughes, Robert W.; Saint-Aubin, Jean; Tremblay, Sébastien – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
In a single large-scale study, we demonstrate that verbal sequence learning as studied using the classic Hebb repetition effect (Hebb, 1961)--the improvement in the serial recall of a repeating sequence compared to nonrepeated sequences--is resilient to both wide and irregular spacing between sequence repetitions. Learning of a repeated sequence…
Descriptors: Verbs, Sequential Learning, Repetition, Recall (Psychology)
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Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Anderson, Rachel J.; Grace, Lydia; Howe, David – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Three experiments investigated the relationship between future thinking and false memories. In Experiment 1, participants remembered familiar events (e.g., a holiday) from their past, imagined planning the same events in the future, or took part in a control condition in which they visualized typical events. They then rated a series of…
Descriptors: Experimental Psychology, Memory, Planning, Visualization
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Juhasz, Barbara J.; Yap, Melvin J.; Raoul, Akila; Kaye, Micaela – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Word frequency is an important predictor of lexical-decision task performance. The current study further examined the role of this variable by exploring the influence of frequency trajectory. Frequency trajectory is measured by how often a word occurs in childhood relative to adulthood. Past research on the role of this variable in word…
Descriptors: Word Frequency, Predictor Variables, Grade 1, College Students
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Undorf, Monika; Zimdahl, Malte F. – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
Words printed in a larger 48-point font are judged to be more memorable than words printed in a smaller 18-point font, although font size does not affect actual memory. To clarify the basis of this font size effect on metamemory and memory, 4 experiments investigated how presenting words in 48 (Experiment 1) or 4 (Experiments 2 to 4) font sizes…
Descriptors: Memory, Metacognition, Printed Materials, Layout (Publications)
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Wei, Hang; Boland, Julie E.; Cai, Zhenguang G.; Yuan, Fang; Wang, Min – Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 2019
We report 2 self-paced reading experiments investigating the longevity of structural priming effects in comprehending reduced relative clauses among adult Chinese-speaking learners of English. Experiment 1 showed that structural priming occurred both when prime and target sentences were immediately adjacent and when they were separated by 1 or 2…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Priming, Second Language Learning, Phrase Structure
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