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Swope, Kurtis J.; Schmitt, Pamela M. – Journal of Economic Education, 2006
Most studies of the determinants of understanding in economics focus on performance in a single course or standardized exam. Taking advantage of a large data set available at the U.S. Naval Academy (USNA), the authors examined the performance of economics majors over an entire curriculum. They found that gender was not a significant predictor of…
Descriptors: Economics Education, Majors (Students), Undergraduate Students, Academic Achievement
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Grove, Wayne A.; Wasserman, Tim; Grodner, Andrew – Journal of Economic Education, 2006
Although academic ability is the most important explanatory variable in studies of student learning, researchers control for it with a wide array and combinations of proxies. The authors investigated how the proxy choice affects estimates of undergraduate student learning by testing over 150 specifications of a single model, each including a…
Descriptors: Academic Aptitude, Educational Research, Research Methodology, Undergraduate Students
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Ballard, Charles L.; Johnson, Marianne F. – Journal of Economic Education, 2004
The authors measure math skills with a broader set of explanatory variables than have been used in previous studies. To identify what math skills are important for student success in introductory microeconomics, they examine (1) the student's score on the mathematics portion of the ACT Assessment Test, (2) whether the student has taken calculus,…
Descriptors: Mathematics Skills, Remedial Mathematics, Mathematical Concepts, Algebra
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Hirschfeld, Mary; And Others – Journal of Economic Education, 1995
Asserts that, on average, women score lower on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) Subject Test in Economics. Reports on a study of 149 student scores on the test to identify factors associated with this differential performance. Finds little support for the notion that men are simply better than women in quantitative areas. (CFR)
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Economics, Economics Education, Females