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Marschark, Marc; Edwards, Lindsey; Peterson, Candida; Crowe, Kathryn; Walton, Dawn – Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2019
Theory of Mind--the understanding that people have thoughts, wants, and beliefs that influence their interpersonal behavior--is an aspect of social cognition that develops with consistent, increasing complexity across age groups, languages, and cultures. Observed delays in theory of mind development among deaf children and others has led to a…
Descriptors: Theory of Mind, Deafness, Comprehension, Beliefs
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Marschark, Marc; Machmer, Elizabeth; Spencer, Linda J.; Borgna, Georgianna; Durkin, Andreana; Convertino, Carol – Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2018
Various studies have examined psychosocial functioning and language abilities among deaf children with and without cochlear implants (CIs). Few, however, have explored how relations among those abilities might change with age and setting. Most relevant studies also have failed to consider that psychosocial functioning among both CI users and…
Descriptors: Assistive Technology, Deafness, Individual Development, Language Acquisition
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Marschark, Marc; Sarchet, Thomastine; Trani, Alexandra – Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2016
Deaf individuals have been found to score lower than hearing individuals across a variety of memory tasks involving both verbal and nonverbal stimuli, particularly those requiring retention of serial order. Deaf individuals who are native signers, meanwhile, have been found to score higher on visual-spatial memory tasks than on verbal-sequential…
Descriptors: Sign Language, Language Usage, Short Term Memory, Hearing (Physiology)
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Marschark, Marc; Spencer, Linda J.; Durkin, Andreana; Borgna, Georgianna; Convertino, Carol; Machmer, Elizabeth; Kronenberger, William G.; Trani, Alexandra – Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 2015
It is frequently assumed that deaf individuals have superior visual-spatial abilities relative to hearing peers and thus, in educational settings, they are often considered visual learners. There is some empirical evidence to support the former assumption, although it is inconsistent, and apparently none to support the latter. Three experiments…
Descriptors: Deafness, Spatial Ability, Visual Acuity, Visual Learning