NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Audience
Researchers5
Laws, Policies, & Programs
What Works Clearinghouse Rating
Showing 106 to 120 of 463 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Grammer, Jennie K.; Coffman, Jennifer L.; Sidney, Pooja; Ornstein, Peter A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Although high-quality early educational environments are thought to be related to the growth of children's skills in mathematics, relatively little is known about specific aspects of classroom instruction that may promote these abilities. Data from a longitudinal investigation were used to investigate associations between teachers' language while…
Descriptors: Mathematics Instruction, Mathematics Skills, Elementary School Teachers, Grade 2
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Peskin, Joan; Comay, Julie; Chen, Xi; Prusky, Carly – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
A critical skill in emergent writing is the developing ability to take the perspective of different readers; however, the precursors of this skill have not yet been identified. In this longitudinal study, 105 children (90 after attrition) were tested at 3 time points: pre-kindergarten (3-4 years old, n = 105), kindergarten (5 years old, n = 97),…
Descriptors: Longitudinal Studies, Theory of Mind, Predictor Variables, Grade 1
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hala, Suzanne; McKay, Lee-Ann; Brown, Alisha M. B.; San Juan, Valerie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Hala, Brown, McKay, and San Juan (2013) found that children as young as 2.5 years of age demonstrated high levels of accuracy when asked to recall whether they or the experimenter had carried out a particular action. In the research reported here, we examined the relation of early-emerging source monitoring to executive function abilities.…
Descriptors: Young Children, Executive Function, Memory, Recall (Psychology)
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Chen, Eva E.; Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Harris, Paul L. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
To adult humans, the task of forming an impression of another social being seems effortless and even obligatory. In 2 experiments, we offer the first systematic cross-cultural examination of impression formation in European American and East Asian preschool children. Children across both cultures easily inferred basic personality traits, such as…
Descriptors: Cross Cultural Studies, Whites, Asians, Preschool Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Levine, Susan C. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Summer slide, uneven growth of academic skills during the calendar year, captures the fact that the learning gains children make during the school year do not continue at the same pace over the summer, when children are typically not in school. We compared growth of reading skills during the school year and during the summer months in children…
Descriptors: Reading Skills, Skill Development, Neurological Impairments, Comparative Analysis
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Salsa, Analía M.; Vivaldi, Romina A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Three studies investigated the effects of pedagogical cues to an artist's referential intention on 2- and 2.5-year-old children's understanding of drawings in a matching task without verbal labels support. Results showed that pedagogical cues, the combination of the artist's eye gaze while she was creating the drawings (nonlinguistic cues), and…
Descriptors: Cues, Artists, Intention, Young Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Löffler, Elisabeth; von der Linden, Nicole; Schneider, Wolfgang – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Two studies were conducted to investigate effects of domain knowledge on metacognitive monitoring across the life span in materials of different complexity. Participants from 4 age groups (3rd-grade children, adolescents, younger and older adults) were compared using an expert-novice paradigm. In Study 1, soccer experts' and novices'…
Descriptors: Metacognition, Age Differences, Grade 3, Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wellman, Henry M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Research with preschool children has shown that explanations are important to them in that they actively seek explanations in their conversations with adults. But what sorts of explanations do they prefer, and what, if anything, do young children learn from the explanations they receive? Following a preliminary study with adults (N = 67) to…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Epistemology, Concept Formation, Knowledge Level
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Landrum, Asheley R.; Pflaum, Amelia D.; Mills, Candice M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
In many ways, evaluating informants based on their features is a problem of induction: Children rely on the assumption that observable informant characteristics (e.g., traits, behaviors, social categories) will predict unobservable characteristics (e.g., future behavior, knowledge states, intentions). Yet to make sensible inferences, children must…
Descriptors: Epistemology, Inferences, Preschool Children, Expertise
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Paukner, Annika – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
In human children and adults, familiar face types--typically own-age and own-species faces--are discriminated better than other face types; however, human infants do not appear to exhibit an own-age bias but instead better discriminate adult faces, which they see more often. There are two possible explanations for this pattern: Perceptual…
Descriptors: Evolution, Human Body, Infants, Prediction
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Burns, Patrick; Russell, James; Russell, Charlotte – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
It is usually accepted that the binding of what, where, and when is a central component of young children's and animals' nonconceptual episodic abilities. We argue that additionally binding self-in-past (what-where-when-"who") adds a crucial conceptual requirement, and we ask when it becomes possible and what its cognitive correlates…
Descriptors: Young Children, Memory, Visual Stimuli, Video Technology
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Subiaul, Francys; Zimmermann, Laura; Renner, Elizabeth; Schilder, Brian; Barr, Rachel – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
During the first 5 years of life, the versatility, breadth, and fidelity with which children imitate change dramatically. Currently, there is no model to explain what underlies such significant changes. To that end, the present study examined whether task-independent but domain-specific--elemental--imitation mechanism explains performance across…
Descriptors: Imitation, Preschool Children, Manipulative Materials, Rewards
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hopkins, Emily J.; Smith, Eric D.; Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Lillard, Angeline S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Substitute object pretense is one of the earliest-developing forms of pretense, and yet it changes considerably across the preschool years. By 3.5 years of age, children can pretend with substitutes that are highly dissimilar from their intended referents (Elder & Pederson, 1978), but even older children have difficulty understanding such…
Descriptors: Young Children, Age Differences, Comprehension, Theory of Mind
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nissel, Jenny; Hawley-Dolan, Angelina; Winner, Ellen – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
While it is sometimes claimed that abstract art requires little skill and is indistinguishable from the scribbles of young children, recent research has shown that even adults with no training in art can distinguish works by abstract expressionists from superficially similar works by children and even elephants, monkeys, and apes (Hawley-Dolan…
Descriptors: Abstract Reasoning, Art, Children, Young Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Verdine, Brian N.; Lucca, Kelsey R.; Golinkoff, Roberta M.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
How do toddlers learn the names of geometric forms? Previous work suggests that preschoolers have fragmentary knowledge and that defining properties are not understood until well into elementary school. The current study investigated when children first begin to understand shape names and how they apply those labels to unusual instances. We tested…
Descriptors: Young Children, Geometric Concepts, Toddlers, School Readiness
Pages: 1  |  ...  |  4  |  5  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  ...  |  31