NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Audience
Researchers5
Laws, Policies, & Programs
What Works Clearinghouse Rating
Showing 136 to 150 of 463 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Mahy, Caitlin E. V.; Moses, Louis J. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
The current study examined the impact of retention interval task difficulty on 4- and 5-year-olds' prospective memory (PM) to test the hypothesis that children periodically monitor their intentions during the retention interval and that disrupting this monitoring may result in poorer PM performance. In addition, relations among PM, working memory,…
Descriptors: Retention (Psychology), Difficulty Level, Memory, Young Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Rowley, Stephanie J.; Camacho, Tissyana C. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
The current article discusses the importance of increasing racial-ethnic and socioeconomic diversity in cognitive developmental research. It begins with discussion of the implications of the underrepresentation of ethnic minority children in cognitive developmental research. It goes on to suggest reasons underlying these omissions, such as the…
Descriptors: Cognitive Development, Research, Cultural Differences, Minority Group Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Huang, Yi; Spelke, Elizabeth S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Map reading is unique to humans but is present in people of diverse cultures, at ages as young as 4 years old. Here, we explore the nature and sources of this ability and ask both what geometric information young children use in maps and what nonsymbolic systems are associated with their map-reading performance. Four-year-old children were given…
Descriptors: Maps, Task Analysis, Correlation, Young Children
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Ishigami, Yoko; Klein, Raymond M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
The current study examined the robustness, stability, reliability, and isolability of the attention network scores (alerting, orienting, and executive control) when young children experienced repeated administrations of the child version of the Attention Network Test (ANT; Rueda et al., 2004). Ten test sessions of the ANT were administered to 12…
Descriptors: Measurement, Attention, Scores, Executive Function
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Gelman, Susan A.; Frazier, Brandy N.; Noles, Nicholaus S.; Manczak, Erika M.; Stilwell, Sarah M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Adults attach special value to objects that link to notable people or events--authentic objects. We examined children's monetary evaluation of authentic objects, focusing on four kinds: celebrity possessions (e.g., Harry Potter's glasses), original creations (e.g., the very first teddy bear), personal possessions (e.g., your…
Descriptors: Age Differences, Adults, Children, Attachment Behavior
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Bainter, Sierra A.; Curran, Patrick J. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Amid recent progress in cognitive development research, high-quality data resources are accumulating, and data sharing and secondary data analysis are becoming increasingly valuable tools. Integrative data analysis (IDA) is an exciting analytical framework that can enhance secondary data analysis in powerful ways. IDA pools item-level data across…
Descriptors: Data Analysis, Integrated Activities, Inferences, Statistical Analysis
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hurley, Karinna B.; Oakes, Lisa M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Although infants' cognitions about the world must be influenced by experience, little research has directly assessed the relation between everyday experience and infants' visual cognition in the laboratory. Eye-tracking procedures were used to measure 4-month-old infants' eye movements as they visually investigated a series of…
Descriptors: Infant Behavior, Eye Movements, Animals, Experience
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Animals, Classification, Prediction
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Williamson, Rebecca A.; Brooks, Rechele; Meltzoff, Andrew N. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Understanding others' perceptions is a fundamental aspect of social cognition. Children's construal of visual perception is well investigated, but there is little work on children's understanding of others' auditory perception. The current study assesses toddlers' recognition that producing different sounds can affect others…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Acoustics, Social Cognition, Auditory Perception
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Smith, Linda B.; Yu, Chen; Yoshida, Hanako; Fausey, Caitlin M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Head-mounted video cameras (with and without an eye camera to track gaze direction) are being increasingly used to study infants' and young children's visual environments and provide new and often unexpected insights about the visual world from a child's point of view. The challenge in using head cameras is principally conceptual and concerns the…
Descriptors: Infants, Young Children, Video Technology, Visual Environment
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Rigney, Jennifer; Wang, Su-hua – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Spatial categorization has a long history in the research of infant cognition and perception. Many conclusions are drawn from the approach wherein infants are habituated to examples of a spatial category X and then display an attention recovery (i.e., dishabituation) to a contrasting category Y. However, the distinction infants make between X and…
Descriptors: Infants, Spatial Ability, Classification, Habituation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Zmyj, Norbert; Bischof-Köhler, Doris – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
What is the developmental course of children's gender constancy? Do other cognitive abilities such as time comprehension and false-belief understanding foster gender constancy and the subcomponents gender stability and gender consistency? We examined the development of gender constancy and its relation to time comprehension and false-belief…
Descriptors: Child Development, Young Children, Sexual Identity, Time
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Van Reet, Jennifer; Green, Kathryn F.; Sobel, David M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Two experiments examined whether particular aspects of social-cognitive knowledge predicted how preschoolers would treat informants who displayed a more or less developed understanding of that knowledge. In Experiment 1, children's own success on false-belief measures correlated with the extent to which they endorsed information generated by a…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Theory of Mind, Trust (Psychology), Correlation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Sobel, David M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Two experiments investigated how preschoolers judge whether learning has occurred. Experiment 1 showed that 3- and 4-year-olds used an individual's ability to demonstrate knowledge to judge whether he/she had learned something, regardless of that individual's claim about whether he/she had learned. Experiment 2 considered whether children…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Evaluative Thinking, Learning, Ability
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Bock, Allison M.; Gallaway, Kristin C.; Hund, Alycia M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
The purpose of this study was to specify the development of and links between executive functioning and theory of mind during middle childhood. One hundred four 7- to 12-year-old children completed a battery of age-appropriate tasks measuring working memory, inhibition, flexibility, theory of mind, and vocabulary. As expected, spatial working…
Descriptors: Executive Function, Theory of Mind, Children, Short Term Memory
Pages: 1  |  ...  |  6  |  7  |  8  |  9  |  10  |  11  |  12  |  13  |  14  |  ...  |  31