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Showing 1 to 15 of 49 results Save | Export
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Duh, Shinchieh; Wang, Su-hua – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Understanding others' preference for a relational category of objects (e.g., prefer darker colored shirts) can be challenging for young children, as it involves comparison of choice options within and across exemplars. Adding to the challenge is occasional inconsistency in choices made by others. Here the authors examined whether 14-month-olds…
Descriptors: Infants, Visual Stimuli, Color, Preferences
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Vonk, Jennifer; Rastogi, Geetanjali – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Children show a bias toward information about shape when labeling or determining category membership for novel objects. The body of work with human children suggests that the shape bias is not restricted to linguistic contexts but is highly contingent on task demands. Testing nonhumans could provide additional information about the salience of…
Descriptors: Animals, Classification, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Bias
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Rodrigues, Pedro F. S.; Pandeirada, Josefa N. S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Adolescence is a developmental period characterized by a complex maturation process of various cognitive abilities. Cognitive control, which includes response inhibition and working memory, is one of them. A typical study on response inhibition to visual stimuli presents distractors and targets on the same display (e.g., the computer screen).…
Descriptors: Spatial Ability, Environmental Influences, Visual Environment, Adolescents
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Howard, Tyler J.; Porter, Blaire M.; Childers, Jane B. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Children learning a verb may benefit from hearing it across situations . At the same time, in everyday contexts, situations in which a verb is heard will be interrupted by distracting events. Using Structural Alignment theory as a framework, Study 1 asks whether children can learn a verb when irrelevant, interleaved events are present. Two½- and…
Descriptors: Verbs, Language Acquisition, Young Children, Age Differences
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Rojo, Dolly P.; Echols, Catharine H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2018
Bilingualism has been associated with a range of cognitive and language-related advantages, including the recognition that words can have different labels across languages. However, most previous research has failed to consider heterogeneity in the linguistic environments of children categorized as monolingual. Our study assessed the influence of…
Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Outcomes of Education, Non English Speaking, Native Speakers
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Rakison, David H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2018
The 4 experiments reported here used the preferential looking and habituation paradigms to examine whether 5-month-olds possess a perceptual template for snakes, sharks, and rodents. It was predicted that if infants possess such a template, then they would attend preferentially to schematic images of these nonhuman animal stimuli relative to…
Descriptors: Infants, Habituation, Eye Movements, Animals
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Antrilli, Nick K.; Wang, Su-hua – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Although action experience has been shown to enhance the development of spatial cognition, the mechanism underlying the effects of action is still unclear. The present research examined the role of visual cues generated during action in promoting infants' mental rotation. We sought to clarify the underlying mechanism by decoupling different…
Descriptors: Cues, Visual Stimuli, Infants, Cognitive Processes
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Friend, Margaret; Pace, Amy E. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
From early in development, segmenting events unfolding in the world in meaningful ways renders input more manageable and facilitates interpretation and prediction. Yet, little is known about how children process action structure in events composed of multiple coarse-grained actions. More importantly, little is known about the time course of action…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Adults, Motion, Cognitive Processes
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Childers, Jane B.; Parrish, Rebecca; Olson, Christina V.; Burch, Clare; Fung, Gavin; McIntyre, Kevin P. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
An important problem verb learners must solve is how to extend verbs. Children could use cross-situational information to guide their extensions; however, comparing events is difficult. In 2 studies, researchers tested whether children benefit from initially seeing a pair of similar events ("progressive alignment") while learning new…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Child Language, Language Acquisition, Verbs
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Salsa, Analía M.; Vivaldi, Romina A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Three studies investigated the effects of pedagogical cues to an artist's referential intention on 2- and 2.5-year-old children's understanding of drawings in a matching task without verbal labels support. Results showed that pedagogical cues, the combination of the artist's eye gaze while she was creating the drawings (nonlinguistic cues), and…
Descriptors: Cues, Artists, Intention, Young Children
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Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Paukner, Annika – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
In human children and adults, familiar face types--typically own-age and own-species faces--are discriminated better than other face types; however, human infants do not appear to exhibit an own-age bias but instead better discriminate adult faces, which they see more often. There are two possible explanations for this pattern: Perceptual…
Descriptors: Evolution, Human Body, Infants, Prediction
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Burns, Patrick; Russell, James; Russell, Charlotte – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
It is usually accepted that the binding of what, where, and when is a central component of young children's and animals' nonconceptual episodic abilities. We argue that additionally binding self-in-past (what-where-when-"who") adds a crucial conceptual requirement, and we ask when it becomes possible and what its cognitive correlates…
Descriptors: Young Children, Memory, Visual Stimuli, Video Technology
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Subiaul, Francys; Zimmermann, Laura; Renner, Elizabeth; Schilder, Brian; Barr, Rachel – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
During the first 5 years of life, the versatility, breadth, and fidelity with which children imitate change dramatically. Currently, there is no model to explain what underlies such significant changes. To that end, the present study examined whether task-independent but domain-specific--elemental--imitation mechanism explains performance across…
Descriptors: Imitation, Preschool Children, Manipulative Materials, Rewards
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Hopkins, Emily J.; Smith, Eric D.; Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Lillard, Angeline S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Substitute object pretense is one of the earliest-developing forms of pretense, and yet it changes considerably across the preschool years. By 3.5 years of age, children can pretend with substitutes that are highly dissimilar from their intended referents (Elder & Pederson, 1978), but even older children have difficulty understanding such…
Descriptors: Young Children, Age Differences, Comprehension, Theory of Mind
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Ferrara, Katrina; Hoffman, James E.; O'Hearn, Kirsten; Landau, Barbara – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
The ability to track moving objects is a crucial skill for performance in everyday spatial tasks. The tracking mechanism depends on representation of moving items as coherent entities, which follow the spatiotemporal constraints of objects in the world. In the present experiment, participants tracked 1 to 4 targets in a display of 8 identical…
Descriptors: Eye Movements, Visual Stimuli, Intellectual Disability, Adults
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