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Showing 1 to 15 of 40 results Save | Export
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Özçaliskan, Seyda; Adamson, Lauren B.; Dimitrova, Nevena; Baumann, Stephanie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Typically developing (TD) children refer to objects uniquely in gesture (e.g., point at a cat) before they produce verbal labels for these objects ("cat"). The onset of such gestures predicts the onset of similar spoken words, showing a strong positive relation between early gestures and early words. We asked whether gesture plays the…
Descriptors: Nonverbal Communication, Autism, Parent Child Relationship, Vocabulary
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Leblanc, Élizabel; Bernier, Annie; Howe, Nina – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Sibling relationships are argued to offer a rich social context for the development of young children's theory of mind (ToM). There is evidence that the presence of siblings, particularly older siblings, may promote preschoolers' ToM, but it has not been investigated among toddlers. This study evaluated differences in early manifestations of ToM…
Descriptors: Sibling Relationship, Theory of Mind, Toddlers, Siblings
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Hwang, Hyesung G.; Marrus, Natasha; Irvin, Kelsey; Markson, Lori – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Humans are motivated to connect with others and are sensitive to social exclusion--intentionally leaving out others. This ability to detect social exclusion is suggested to be evolutionarily adaptive, biologically hardwired, and an important feature of social-cognitive development. Yet it is unclear when children start to independently detect…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Peer Relationship, Social Isolation, Peer Acceptance
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Friend, Margaret; Pace, Amy E. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
From early in development, segmenting events unfolding in the world in meaningful ways renders input more manageable and facilitates interpretation and prediction. Yet, little is known about how children process action structure in events composed of multiple coarse-grained actions. More importantly, little is known about the time course of action…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Adults, Motion, Cognitive Processes
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Childers, Jane B.; Parrish, Rebecca; Olson, Christina V.; Burch, Clare; Fung, Gavin; McIntyre, Kevin P. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
An important problem verb learners must solve is how to extend verbs. Children could use cross-situational information to guide their extensions; however, comparing events is difficult. In 2 studies, researchers tested whether children benefit from initially seeing a pair of similar events ("progressive alignment") while learning new…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Child Language, Language Acquisition, Verbs
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Verdine, Brian N.; Lucca, Kelsey R.; Golinkoff, Roberta M.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Newcombe, Nora S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
How do toddlers learn the names of geometric forms? Previous work suggests that preschoolers have fragmentary knowledge and that defining properties are not understood until well into elementary school. The current study investigated when children first begin to understand shape names and how they apply those labels to unusual instances. We tested…
Descriptors: Young Children, Geometric Concepts, Toddlers, School Readiness
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Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Animals, Classification, Prediction
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Williamson, Rebecca A.; Brooks, Rechele; Meltzoff, Andrew N. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Understanding others' perceptions is a fundamental aspect of social cognition. Children's construal of visual perception is well investigated, but there is little work on children's understanding of others' auditory perception. The current study assesses toddlers' recognition that producing different sounds can affect others…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Acoustics, Social Cognition, Auditory Perception
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Tunçgenç, Bahar; Hohenberger, Annette; Rakoczy, Hannes – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Two studies investigated young 2- and 3-year-old Turkish children's developing understanding of normativity and freedom to act in games. As expected, children, especially 3-year-olds, protested more when there was a norm violation than when there was none. Surprisingly, however, no decrease in normative protest was observed even when the actor…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Toddlers, Investigations, Games
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Nakamichi, Naoko – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Recent studies indicate the need to investigate the sources of toddlers' understanding of another person's pretense. The present study is a cultural and longitudinal extension of the work of Lillard and Witherington (2004), who claimed that mothers modify their behaviors during pretense and that the some of these behavior modifications help their…
Descriptors: Mothers, Behavior Modification, Toddlers, Comprehension
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Lyons, Ian M.; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Ratliff, Kristin R. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Previous studies of children's reorientation have focused on cue representation (e.g., whether cues are geometric) as a predictor of performance but have not addressed cue reliability (the regularity of the relation between a given cue and an outcome) as a predictor of performance. Here we address both factors within the same series of…
Descriptors: Cues, Spatial Ability, Toddlers, Young Children
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James, Karin H.; Jones, Susan S.; Smith, Linda B.; Swain, Shelley N. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Two important and related developments in children between 18 and 24 months of age are the rapid expansion of object name vocabularies and the emergence of an ability to recognize objects from sparse representations of their geometric shapes. In the same period, children also begin to show a preference for planar views (i.e., views of objects held…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Recognition (Psychology), Vocabulary, Preferences
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Kim, Sunae; Harris, Paul L. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Children are able to distinguish between regular events that can occur in everyday reality and magical events that are ordinarily impossible. How do children respond to a person who brings about magical as compared with ordinary outcomes? In two studies, we tested children's acceptance of informants' claims when the informants had produced either…
Descriptors: Beliefs, Fantasy, Trust (Psychology), Comparative Analysis
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Childers, Jane B.; Hirshkowitz, Amy; Benavides, Kristin – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Contrast information could be useful for verb learning, but few studies have examined children's ability to use this type of information. Contrast may be useful when children are told explicitly that different verbs apply, or when they hear two different verbs in a single context. Three studies examine children's attention to different types of…
Descriptors: Verbs, Language Acquisition, Control Groups, Cues
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Lyon, Thomas D.; Quas, Jodi A.; Carrick, Nathalie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2013
Two studies examined young children's early understanding and evaluation of truth telling and lying and the role that factuality plays in their judgments. Study 1 (one hundred four 2- to 5-year-olds) found that even the youngest children reliably accepted true statements and rejected false statements and that older children's ability to…
Descriptors: Deception, Cognitive Ability, Toddlers, Young Children
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