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Hala, Suzanne; McKay, Lee-Ann; Brown, Alisha M. B.; San Juan, Valerie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Hala, Brown, McKay, and San Juan (2013) found that children as young as 2.5 years of age demonstrated high levels of accuracy when asked to recall whether they or the experimenter had carried out a particular action. In the research reported here, we examined the relation of early-emerging source monitoring to executive function abilities.…
Descriptors: Young Children, Executive Function, Memory, Recall (Psychology)
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Peterson, Carole; Fowler, Tania; Brandeau, Katherine M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Four- to 11-year-old children were interviewed about 2 different sorts of memories in the same home visit: recent memories of highly salient and stressful events--namely, injuries serious enough to require hospital emergency room treatment--and their earliest memories. Injury memories were scored for amount of unique information, completeness…
Descriptors: Memory, Recall (Psychology), Young Children, Children
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Hala, Suzanne; Brown, Alisha M. B.; McKay, Lee-Ann; San Juan, Valerie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2013
This research examines the early emergence of source-monitoring abilities. Previous research has consistently demonstrated that children as young as 3 to 4 years of age do well on simple versions of action-based source-monitoring tasks. Research on even younger children, however, remains lacking. In this study we examined whether 2 1/2-year-olds…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Memory, Foreign Countries, Measures (Individuals)
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Peterson, Carole; Warren, Kelly L.; Hayes, Ashli H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2013
A problematic issue for forensic interviewers is that young children provide limited information in response to open-ended recall questions. Although quantity of information is greater if children are asked more focused prompts and closed question types such as yes/no or forced choice questions, the quality of their responses is potentially…
Descriptors: Interviews, Young Children, Stress Variables, Injuries
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Saylor, Megan M.; Baird, Jodie A.; Gallerani, Catherine – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2006
Children's observation of the given-new contract was tested with a task requiring children to provide novel, rather than known, information about an event to a listener. Study 1 revealed developmental differences in children's adherence to the contract: 4- and 5-year-olds showed better adherence to the contract than 3-year-olds. In Studies 2 and…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Age Differences, Individual Development, Cognitive Processes