NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Audience
Laws, Policies, & Programs
What Works Clearinghouse Rating
Showing 1 to 15 of 40 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Rojo, Dolly P.; Echols, Catharine H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2018
Bilingualism has been associated with a range of cognitive and language-related advantages, including the recognition that words can have different labels across languages. However, most previous research has failed to consider heterogeneity in the linguistic environments of children categorized as monolingual. Our study assessed the influence of…
Descriptors: Bilingual Education, Outcomes of Education, Non English Speaking, Native Speakers
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Venkadasalam, Vaunam P.; Ganea, Patricia A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2018
This study examined whether children 4- and 5-years-old (N = 156) can revise a physical science misconception from different types of picture books. A realistic fiction book and informational book with identical images matched in word count and reading difficulty level were compared to a control book about plants. In the pretest and posttest,…
Descriptors: Young Children, Misconceptions, Scientific Concepts, Comparative Analysis
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Özçaliskan, Seyda; Adamson, Lauren B.; Dimitrova, Nevena; Baumann, Stephanie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Typically developing (TD) children refer to objects uniquely in gesture (e.g., point at a cat) before they produce verbal labels for these objects ("cat"). The onset of such gestures predicts the onset of similar spoken words, showing a strong positive relation between early gestures and early words. We asked whether gesture plays the…
Descriptors: Nonverbal Communication, Autism, Parent Child Relationship, Vocabulary
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Bacso, Sarah A.; Nilsen, Elizabeth S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Young children often provide ambiguous referential statements. Thus, the ability to identify when miscommunication has occurred and subsequently repair messages is an essential component of communicative development. The present study examined the impact of listener feedback and children's executive functioning in influencing children's ability to…
Descriptors: Executive Function, Young Children, Communication Skills, Feedback (Response)
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Macris, Deanna M.; Sobel, David M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Three experiments examined whether 4- and 5-year-olds can explicitly revise uncertain beliefs in light of disconfirming evidence. We considered 2 factors that might influence belief revision: (a) the type and variability of evidence provided, and (b) whether children generated an explanation of their initial hypothesis. When provided with limited…
Descriptors: Role, Preschool Children, Evidence, Cognitive Processes
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Friend, Margaret; Pace, Amy E. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
From early in development, segmenting events unfolding in the world in meaningful ways renders input more manageable and facilitates interpretation and prediction. Yet, little is known about how children process action structure in events composed of multiple coarse-grained actions. More importantly, little is known about the time course of action…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Adults, Motion, Cognitive Processes
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Frazier, Brandy N.; Gelman, Susan A.; Wellman, Henry M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Research with preschool children has shown that explanations are important to them in that they actively seek explanations in their conversations with adults. But what sorts of explanations do they prefer, and what, if anything, do young children learn from the explanations they receive? Following a preliminary study with adults (N = 67) to…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Epistemology, Concept Formation, Knowledge Level
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hopkins, Emily J.; Smith, Eric D.; Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Lillard, Angeline S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Substitute object pretense is one of the earliest-developing forms of pretense, and yet it changes considerably across the preschool years. By 3.5 years of age, children can pretend with substitutes that are highly dissimilar from their intended referents (Elder & Pederson, 1978), but even older children have difficulty understanding such…
Descriptors: Young Children, Age Differences, Comprehension, Theory of Mind
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Abuhatoum, Shireen; Howe, Nina; Della Porta, Sandra; Recchia, Holly; Ross, Hildy – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
This study examined siblings' knowledge about the teaching concept during naturalistic teaching contexts, wherein children's communicative interactions were used as a gateway to their social understanding (Turnbull, Carpendale, & Racine, 2009). Participants included 39 sibling dyads (older age group, M[subscript age] = 6;4; younger age group,…
Descriptors: Siblings, Children, Knowledge Level, Teaching (Occupation)
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Ziv, Margalit; Solomon, Ayelet; Strauss, Sidney; Frye, Douglas – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
The relations among children's theory of mind (ToM), their understanding of the intentionality of teaching, and their own peer teaching strategies were tested. Seventy-five 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds completed 11 ToM and understanding-of-teaching tasks. Subsequently, 30 of the children were randomly chosen to teach a peer how to play a board game,…
Descriptors: Theory of Mind, Young Children, Peer Teaching, Games
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Nolan-Reyes, Charlotte; Callanan, Maureen A.; Haigh, Kirsten A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Young children tend to judge improbable events to be impossible, yet there is variability across age and across individuals. Our study examined parent-child conversations about impossible and improbable events and links between parents' explanations about those events and children's possibility judgments in a reasoning task. Regression analyses…
Descriptors: Parent Attitudes, Young Children, Regression (Statistics), Reading Aloud to Others
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Yott, Jessica; Poulin-Dubois, Diane – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
The development of theory of mind (ToM) in infancy has been mainly documented through studies conducted on a single age group with a single task. Very few studies have examined ToM abilities other than false belief, and very few studies have used a within-subjects design. During 2 testing sessions, infants aged 14 and 18 months old were…
Descriptors: Infants, Theory of Mind, Cognitive Ability, Intention
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Namboodiripad, Savithry; Mylander, Carolyn; Özyürek, Asli; Sancar, Burcu – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Deaf children whose hearing losses prevent them from accessing spoken language and whose hearing parents have not exposed them to sign language develop gesture systems, called "homesigns", which have many of the properties of natural language--the so-called resilient properties of language. We explored the resilience of structure built…
Descriptors: Resilience (Psychology), Sign Language, Verbs, Deafness
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Posid, Tasha; Cordes, Sara – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
A crucial component of numerical understanding is one's ability to abstract numerical properties regardless of varying perceptual attributes. Evidence from numerical match-to-sample tasks suggests that children find it difficult to match sets based on number in the face of varying perceptual attributes, yet it is unclear whether these findings are…
Descriptors: Computation, Young Children, Perception, Verbal Communication
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Peterson, Carole; Fowler, Tania; Brandeau, Katherine M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Four- to 11-year-old children were interviewed about 2 different sorts of memories in the same home visit: recent memories of highly salient and stressful events--namely, injuries serious enough to require hospital emergency room treatment--and their earliest memories. Injury memories were scored for amount of unique information, completeness…
Descriptors: Memory, Recall (Psychology), Young Children, Children
Previous Page | Next Page »
Pages: 1  |  2  |  3