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Showing 1 to 15 of 34 results Save | Export
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Vonk, Jennifer; Rastogi, Geetanjali – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Children show a bias toward information about shape when labeling or determining category membership for novel objects. The body of work with human children suggests that the shape bias is not restricted to linguistic contexts but is highly contingent on task demands. Testing nonhumans could provide additional information about the salience of…
Descriptors: Animals, Classification, Novelty (Stimulus Dimension), Bias
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Gülgöz, Selin; Gomez, Eric M.; DeMeules, Madeleine R.; Olson, Kristina R. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2018
Despite extant evidence of negative peer treatment of transgender adolescents and adults, little is known about how young children perceive transgender peers, particularly those who have socially transitioned or are living in line with their gender rather than sex at birth. Whereas children have been shown to be averse to gender nonconformity in…
Descriptors: Children, Sexual Identity, Gender Issues, Identification (Psychology)
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Roberts, Steven O.; Gelman, Susan A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
Research has explored how multiracial individuals are categorized by monoracial individuals, but it has not yet explored how they are categorized by multiracial individuals themselves. We examined how multiracial children (aged 4-9 years old) and adults categorized multiracial targets (presented with and without parentage information). When…
Descriptors: Multiracial Persons, Children, Adults, Classification
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Landry, Oriane; Al-Taie, Shems; Franklin, Ari – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2017
The Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS) task is a widely used measure of preschoolers' executive function. We combined data for 3,290 3-year-olds from 37 unique studies reporting 130 experimental conditions. Using raw pass/fail counts, we computed the pass rates and chi-squared value for each against chance (50/50) performance. We grouped data…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Executive Function, Child Behavior, Color
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Dunham, Yarrow; Olson, Kristina R. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Developmental research on social categorization has overwhelmingly focused on perceptions about and experiences of individuals who are clear or prototypical members of discrete and usually dichotomous social categories. For example, studies of social categorization, stereotyping, prejudice, and social identity have generally explored how children…
Descriptors: Social Influences, Classification, Labeling (of Persons), Social Attitudes
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Hala, Suzanne; McKay, Lee-Ann; Brown, Alisha M. B.; San Juan, Valerie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Hala, Brown, McKay, and San Juan (2013) found that children as young as 2.5 years of age demonstrated high levels of accuracy when asked to recall whether they or the experimenter had carried out a particular action. In the research reported here, we examined the relation of early-emerging source monitoring to executive function abilities.…
Descriptors: Young Children, Executive Function, Memory, Recall (Psychology)
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Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Animals, Classification, Prediction
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Rigney, Jennifer; Wang, Su-hua – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Spatial categorization has a long history in the research of infant cognition and perception. Many conclusions are drawn from the approach wherein infants are habituated to examples of a spatial category X and then display an attention recovery (i.e., dishabituation) to a contrasting category Y. However, the distinction infants make between X and…
Descriptors: Infants, Spatial Ability, Classification, Habituation
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Hall, D. Geoffrey; Rhemtulla, Mijke – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Recent research has established that contrast can exert a powerful effect on early word learning. This study examined the role of contrast in young children's ability to learn proper names. Preschoolers heard a novel word for an unfamiliar stuffed animal in the presence of a second stuffed animal of either the same or a different kind.…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Vocabulary Development, Nouns, Word Recognition
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Rhodes, Marjorie; Gelman, Susan A.; Karuza, J. Christopher – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
These studies examined the role of ontological beliefs about category boundaries in early categorization. Study 1 found that preschool-age children (N = 48, aged 3-4 years old) have domain-specific beliefs about the meaning of category boundaries; children judged the boundaries of natural kind categories (animal species, human gender) as discrete…
Descriptors: Role, Beliefs, Preschool Children, Classification
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Chalik, Lisa; Rhodes, Marjorie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Developing mechanisms for predicting human action is a critical task of early conceptual development. Three studies examined whether 4-year-old children (N = 149) use social allegiances to predict behavior, by testing whether they expect the experiences of social partners to influence individual action. After being exposed to a conflict between…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Prediction, Friendship, Conflict
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Baron, Andrew Scott; Dunham, Yarrow; Banaji, Mahzarin; Carey, Susan – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Determining which dimensions of social classification are culturally significant is a developmental challenge. Some suggest this is accomplished by differentially privileging intrinsic visual cues over nonintrinsic cues (Atran, 1990; Gil-White, 2001), whereas others point to the role of noun labels as more general promoters of kind-based reasoning…
Descriptors: Cues, Classification, Nouns, Visual Stimuli
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Oakes, Lisa M.; Kovack-Lesh, Kristine A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2013
Six-month-old infants' ("N" = 168) memory for individual items in a categorized list (e.g., images of dogs or cats) was examined to investigate the interactions between visual recognition memory, working memory, and categorization. In Experiments 1 and 2, infants were familiarized with six different cats or dogs, presented one at a time…
Descriptors: Infants, Memory, Visual Perception, Classification
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Martarelli, Corinna S.; Mast, Fred W. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2013
Children aged 3 to 8 years old and adults were tested on a reality–fantasy distinction task. They had to judge whether particular entities were real or fantastical, and response times were collected. We further manipulated whether the entity is a specific character or a generic fantastical entity. The results indicate that children, unlike adults,…
Descriptors: Young Children, Adults, Fantasy, Realism
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Dick, Anthony Steven – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2012
Two experiments examined processes underlying cognitive inflexibility in set-shifting tasks typically used to assess the development of executive function in children. Adult participants performed a Flexible Item Selection Task (FIST) that requires shifting from categorizing by one dimension (e.g., color) to categorizing by a second orthogonal…
Descriptors: Adults, Undergraduate Students, Cognitive Processes, Classification
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