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De Bordes, Pieter F.; Hasselman, Fred; Cox, Ralf F. A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
From a perceptual learning perspective, infants use social information (like gaze direction) in a similar way as other information in our physical environment (like object movements) to specify action possibilities. In the current study, we assumed that infants are able to learn an affordance upon observing an adult failing to act out that…
Descriptors: Infants, Perceptual Development, Observation, Cues
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Paulus, Markus; Fikkert, Paula – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
Language acquisition is a process embedded in social routines. Despite considerable attention in research to its social nature, little is known about developmental differences in the relative priority of certain social cues over others during early word learning. Employing an eye-tracking paradigm, we presented 14-month-old infants, 24-month-old…
Descriptors: Infants, Vocabulary Development, Language Acquisition, Eye Movements
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Friso-van den Bos, Ilona; Kolkman, Meijke E.; Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Leseman, Paul P. M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2014
The present study aims to examine relations between number representations and various sources of individual differences within early stages of development of number representations. The mental number line has been found to develop from a logarithmic to a more linear representation. Sources under investigation are counting skills and executive…
Descriptors: Numeracy, Individual Differences, Number Concepts, Executive Function
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Huizinga, Mariette; Burack, Jacob A.; Van der Molen, Maurits W. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2010
The focus of this study was the developmental pattern of the ability to shift attention between global and local levels of hierarchical stimuli. Children aged 7 years and 11 years and 21-year-old adults were administered a task (two experiments) that allowed for the examination of 1) the direction of attention to global or local stimulus levels;…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Stimuli, Children, Young Adults