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Volkmer, Anna; Spector, Aimee; Warren, Jason D.; Beeke, Suzanne – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2019
Background: Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) describes a heterogeneous group of language-led dementias. People with this type of dementia are increasingly being referred to speech and language therapy (SLT) services. Yet, there is a paucity of research evidence focusing on PPA interventions and little is known about SLT practice in terms of…
Descriptors: Aphasia, Speech Therapy, Dementia, Intervention
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Groenewold, Rimke; Armstrong, Elizabeth – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2018
Background: Previous research has shown that speakers with aphasia rely on enactment more often than non-brain-damaged language users. Several studies have been conducted to explain this observed increase, demonstrating that spoken language containing enactment is easier to produce and is more engaging to the conversation partner. This paper…
Descriptors: Aphasia, Interpersonal Communication, Brain, Neurological Impairments
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Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2014
Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…
Descriptors: Semantics, Neurological Impairments, Communication Problems, Pragmatics
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Carlsson, Emilia; Hartelius, Lena; Saldert, Charlotta – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2014
Background: A communicative disability interferes with the affected person's ability to take active part in social interaction, but non-disabled communication partners may use different strategies to support communication. However, it is not known whether similar strategies can be used to compensate for different types of communicative…
Descriptors: Communication Strategies, Spouses, Communication Disorders, Neurological Impairments
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Johnson, Sarah; Cocks, Naomi; Dipper, Lucy – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2013
Background: Spatial communication consists of both verbal spatial language and gesture. There has been minimal research investigating the use of spatial communication, and even less focussing on people with aphasia. Aims: The aims of this exploratory study were to describe the frequency and variability of spatial language and gesture use by three…
Descriptors: Spatial Ability, Interpersonal Communication, Communication Skills, Aphasia
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Ferm, Ulrika; Sahlin, Anna; Sundin, Linda; Hartelius, Lena – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2010
Background: Many individuals with Huntington's disease experience reduced functioning in cognition, language and communication. Talking Mats is a visually based low technological augmentative communication framework that supports communication in people with different cognitive and communicative disabilities. Aims: To evaluate Talking Mats as a…
Descriptors: Diseases, Neurological Impairments, Communication Problems, Interpersonal Communication
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Dalemans, Ruth J. P.; de Witte, Luc; Wade, Derick; van den Heuvel, Wim – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2010
Background: Little is known about the way people with aphasia perceive their social participation and its influencing factors. Aims: To explore how people with aphasia perceive participation in society and to investigate influencing factors. Methods & Procedures: In this qualitative study thirteen persons with aphasia and twelve central…
Descriptors: Interpersonal Communication, Social Life, Aphasia, Focus Groups
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Bloch, Steven; Wilkinson, Ray – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2009
Background: Acquired progressive dysarthria is traditionally assessed, rated, and researched using measures of speech perception and intelligibility. The focus is commonly on the individual with dysarthria and how speech deviates from a normative range. A complementary approach is to consider the features and consequences of dysarthric speech as…
Descriptors: Intervals, Speech Impairments, Auditory Perception, Interaction
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Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2009
Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…
Descriptors: Head Injuries, Semantic Differential, Measures (Individuals), Psychometrics
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O'Halloran, Robyn; Hickson, Louise; Worrall, Linda – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2008
The importance of effective healthcare communication between healthcare providers and people needing healthcare is well established. People with communication disabilities are at risk of not being able to communicate effectively with their healthcare providers and this might directly compromise their health, healthcare and their right to…
Descriptors: Hospitals, Communication Disorders, Classification, Interpersonal Communication
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Barrow, Rozanne – International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders, 2008
Background: Listening to how people talk about the consequences of acquired aphasia helps one gain insight into how people construe disability and communication disability in particular. It has been found that some of these construals can be more of a disabling barrier in re-engaging with life than the communication impairment itself. Aims: To…
Descriptors: Interviews, Social Attitudes, Participant Observation, Aphasia