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Turner, Lauren A.; Angulo, A. J. – Harvard Educational Review, 2018
Lauren A. Turner and A. J. Angulo explore how institutional theory can be applied to explain variance in higher education organizational strategies. Given strong regulatory, normative, and cultural-cognitive pressures to conform, they ask, why do some colleges engage in high-risk decision making? To answer this, they bring together classic and…
Descriptors: Risk, Decision Making, Higher Education, Trend Analysis
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Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark – Harvard Educational Review, 2010
In 2003, the "Harvard Educational Review" published a controversial article by Roy Freedle that claimed bias against African American students in the SAT college admissions test. Freedle's work stimulated national media attention and faced an onslaught of criticism from experts at the Educational Testing Service (ETS), the agency…
Descriptors: College Entrance Examinations, Test Bias, Test Items, Difficulty Level
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Freedle, Roy O. – Harvard Educational Review, 2010
In this commentary, the author discusses two recent replications (Santelices & Wilson, 2010; Scherbaum & Goldstein, 2008) of some of his earlier work on SAT items using the differential item functioning (DIF) statistic wherein he contrasted the test performance of African American examinees with White examinees (Freedle, 2003). In this…
Descriptors: College Entrance Examinations, Test Bias, Test Items, Difficulty Level
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Dorans, Neil J. – Harvard Educational Review, 2010
In his 2003 article in the "Harvard Educational Review" (HER), Freedle claimed that the SAT was both culturally and statistically biased and proposed a solution to ameliorate this bias. The author argued (Dorans, 2004a) that these claims were based on serious computational errors. In particular, he focused on how Freedle's table 2 was…
Descriptors: College Entrance Examinations, Test Bias, Test Items, Difficulty Level
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Santelices, Maria Veronica; Wilson, Mark – Harvard Educational Review, 2010
In their paper "Unfair Treatment? The Case of Freedle, the SAT, and the Standardization Approach to Differential Item Functioning" (Santelices & Wilson, 2010), the authors studied claims of differential effects of the SAT on Latinos and African Americans through the methodology of differential item functioning (DIF). Previous…
Descriptors: College Entrance Examinations, Test Bias, Test Items, Difficulty Level
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Zwick, Rebecca – Harvard Educational Review, 2007
In this essay, Rebecca Zwick confronts the controversy surrounding the use of standardized tests in college admissions. She examines the degree to which the SAT and its lesser known cousin, the ACT, limit access to college, particularly for racial and ethnic minorities, and considers two alternative admissions policies that do not involve tests:…
Descriptors: Class Rank, Standardized Tests, Academic Achievement, Academic Standards
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Dorans, Neil J. – Harvard Educational Review, 2004
The Editorial Board welcomes comments on articles, reviews, and letters that have appeared in the "Harvard Educational Review." Longer pieces are published in this "Further Comment" section, in full or in part, at the Editors' discretion. Authors of the articles under discussion are invited to respond. In this section, the…
Descriptors: Aptitude Tests, Test Bias, African Americans, Hispanic Americans
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Freedle, Roy O. – Harvard Educational Review, 2004
I see much to be pleased with in Dorans' interesting response to my article, "Correcting the SAT's Ethnic and Social-Class Bias: A Method for Reestimating SAT Scores." However, I need to deal with several unstated assumptions and errors that underlie his presentation. In the process of enumerating his covert assumptions, I will take up…
Descriptors: Aptitude Tests, Scores, Statistical Analysis, African American Students
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Steelman, Lala Carr; Powell, Brian; Carini, Robert M. – Harvard Educational Review, 2000
Comparison of standardized test scores and degree of teacher unionization in states found a statistically significant and positive relationship between the presence of teacher unions and stronger state performance on tests. Taking into account the percentage of students taking the tests, states with greater percentages of teachers in unions…
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Scores, Secondary Education, Teachers
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Wainer, Howard; Steinberg, Linda S. – Harvard Educational Review, 1992
Matching almost 47,000 men and women on type of math course taken and grade received, women scored about 33 points lower on the Scholastic Aptitude Test-Mathematics than men who had taken the same course and received the same grade. Sex differences call into question the validity of the SAT as a predictor of college math performance. (SK)
Descriptors: College Mathematics, Grades (Scholastic), Higher Education, Mathematics Achievement
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Hanford, George H. – Harvard Educational Review, 1985
Discusses the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and its importance to colleges in admissions decisions. The author describes the admissions process, the role of test scores, and the relationships of class ranks and SAT scores to outcomes in college. (CT)
Descriptors: Admission Criteria, Class Rank, College Admission, Grade Point Average
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Crouse, James – Harvard Educational Review, 1985
Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of high school students to calculate the actual improvement in freshman grade point average, college completion, and total years of schooling from colleges' use of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), Crouse compares predictions based on high school rank to argue that the SAT's costs do not justify…
Descriptors: Academic Achievement, Admission Criteria, Class Rank, College Applicants
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Powell, Brian; Steelman, Lala Carr – Harvard Educational Review, 1996
Updates an earlier study by reanalyzing interstate variations in Scholastic Aptitude Test and American College Test scores. Reaffirms the conclusion that state rankings based on such scores change dramatically when adjusted for number of test takers or class rank of test-taking population. Finds that public expenditures are positively related to…
Descriptors: Comparative Analysis, Educational Quality, Scores, State Programs
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Crouse, James; Trusheim, Dale – Harvard Educational Review, 1991
Demonstrates that selection benefits of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) are minimal. Demonstrates that the Crosstabulation of Predicted Grades and the College Outcomes Tables would allow colleges to identify the level of redundancy in predicted admissions based on high school grade point average and to estimate the impact of the SAT on…
Descriptors: Admission Criteria, College Admission, College Applicants, College Entrance Examinations
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Powell, Brian; Steelman, Lala Carr – Harvard Educational Review, 1984
The authors attempt to show how the dissemination of uncorrected state Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores may have created an inaccurate public and governmental perception of the variation in educational quality. Their research demonstrates that comparing state SAT averages is ill-advised unless these ratings are corrected for compositional and…
Descriptors: Demography, Educational Quality, Institutional Characteristics, Mathematics Achievement
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