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Showing 1 to 15 of 40 results Save | Export
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Yi, Youngmin; Wildeman, Christopher – Future of Children, 2018
Children who experience foster care, write Youngmin Yi and Christopher Wildeman, are considerably more likely than others to have contact with the criminal justice system, both during childhood and as adults. And because children of color disproportionately experience foster care, improvements to the foster care system could reduce racial/ethnic…
Descriptors: Foster Care, Intervention, Juvenile Justice, Child Welfare
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Hirschfield, Paul J. – Future of Children, 2018
Children's school experiences may contribute in many ways to disproportionate minority contact with the juvenile justice system, writes Paul Hirschfield. For example, research shows that black students who violate school rules are more often subject to out-of-school suspensions, which heighten their risk of arrest and increase the odds that once…
Descriptors: School Role, Juvenile Justice, Disproportionate Representation, Minority Group Students
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Raley, R. Kelly; Sweeney, Megan M.; Wondra, Danielle – Future of Children, 2015
The United States shows striking racial and ethnic differences in marriage patterns. Compared to both white and Hispanic women, black women marry later in life, are less likely to marry at all, and have higher rates of marital instability. Kelly Raley, Megan Sweeney, and Danielle Wondra begin by reviewing common explanations for these differences,…
Descriptors: Marriage, Racial Differences, Ethnicity, African Americans
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Rosenbaum, Sara; Blum, Robert – Future of Children, 2015
The past century has seen vast improvements in our children's health. The infectious diseases that once killed huge numbers of children have largely been conquered. Infant mortality has also fallen markedly, although the United States lags behind other industrialized nations in this and other measures of children's health. Accidents and injuries…
Descriptors: Child Health, Communicable Diseases, Infant Mortality, Accidents
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Clever, Molly; Segal, David R. – Future of Children, 2013
Since the advent of the all-volunteer force in the 1970s, marriage, parenthood, and family life have become commonplace in the U.S. military among enlisted personnel and officers alike, and military spouses and children now outnumber service members by a ratio of 1.4 to 1. Reviewing data from the government and from academic and nonacademic…
Descriptors: Military Service, Military Personnel, Family Environment, Family Characteristics
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Reardon, Sean F.; Valentino, Rachel A.; Shores, Kenneth A. – Future of Children, 2012
How well do U.S. students read? In this article, Sean Reardon, Rachel Valentino, and Kenneth Shores rely on studies using data from national and international literacy assessments to answer this question. In part, the answer depends on the specific literacy skills assessed. The authors show that almost all U.S. students can "read" by…
Descriptors: Literacy, Reading Skills, Developed Nations, Race
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Landale, Nancy S.; Thomas, Kevin J. A.; Van Hook, Jennifer – Future of Children, 2011
Children of immigrants are a rapidly growing part of the U.S. child population. Their health, development, educational attainment, and social and economic integration into the nation's life will play a defining role in the nation's future. Nancy Landale, Kevin Thomas, and Jennifer Van Hook explore the challenges facing immigrant families as they…
Descriptors: Human Capital, Poverty, Immigration, Asian Americans
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Baum, Sandy; Flores, Stella M. – Future of Children, 2011
The increasing role that immigrants and their children, especially those from Latin America, are playing in American society, Sandy Baum and Stella Flores argue, makes it essential that as many young newcomers as possible enroll and succeed in postsecondary education. Immigrant youths from some countries find the doors to the nation's colleges…
Descriptors: Postsecondary Education, Mexican Americans, Foreign Countries, Immigrants
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Perreira, Krista M.; Ornelas, India J. – Future of Children, 2011
Poor childhood health contributes to lower socioeconomic status in adulthood. Subsequently, low socioeconomic status among parents contributes to poor childhood health outcomes in the next generation. This cycle can be particularly pernicious for vulnerable and low-income minority populations, including many children of immigrants. And because of…
Descriptors: Socioeconomic Status, Economically Disadvantaged, Physical Health, Health Insurance
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Bookman, Ann; Kimbrel, Delia – Future of Children, 2011
Although most Americans know that the U.S. population is aging, they are far less informed about the reality of providing elders with personal care, health care, and social support. Families--particularly women--have always been critical in providing elder care, but the entry of so many women into the paid labor force has made elder care…
Descriptors: Caregivers, Family Work Relationship, Older Adults, Aging (Individuals)
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Crosnoe, Robert; Turley, Ruth N. Lopez – Future of Children, 2011
The children from immigrant families in the United States make up a historically diverse population, and they are demonstrating just as much diversity in their experiences in the K-12 educational system. Robert Crosnoe and Ruth Lopez Turley summarize these K-12 patterns, paying special attention to differences in academic functioning across…
Descriptors: Evidence, School Readiness, College Preparation, Elementary Secondary Education
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McLanahan, Sara; Beck, Audrey N. – Future of Children, 2010
As nonmarital childbearing escalated in the United States over the past half century, fragile families--defined as unmarried couples with children--drew increased interest from researchers and policy makers. Sara McLanahan and Audrey Beck discuss four aspects of parental relationships in these families: the quality of parents' intimate…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Parent Child Relationship, Fathers, Child Welfare
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Hummer, Robert A.; Hamilton, Erin R. – Future of Children, 2010
Robert Hummer and Erin Hamilton note that the prevalence of fragile families varies substantially by race and ethnicity. African Americans and Hispanics have the highest prevalence; Asian Americans, the lowest; and whites fall somewhere in the middle. The share of unmarried births is lower among most foreign-born mothers than among their U.S.-born…
Descriptors: Gender Differences, African Americans, Racial Differences, At Risk Persons
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Wildeman, Christopher; Western, Bruce – Future of Children, 2010
Since the mid-1970s the U.S. imprisonment rate has increased roughly fivefold. As Christopher Wildeman and Bruce Western explain, the effects of this sea change in the imprisonment rate--commonly called mass imprisonment or the prison boom--have been concentrated among those most likely to form fragile families: poor and minority men with little…
Descriptors: Crime, Safety, Correctional Institutions, Economically Disadvantaged
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Goldrick-Rab, Sara; Sorensen, Kia – Future of Children, 2010
Noting that access to higher education has expanded dramatically in the past several decades, Sara Goldrick-Rab and Kia Sorensen focus on how unmarried parents fare once they enter college. Contrary to the expectation that access to college consistently promotes family stability and economic security, the authors argue that deficiencies in current…
Descriptors: Counseling Services, Community Colleges, State Aid, College Attendance
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