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Phelps, Michelle S. – Future of Children, 2018
The United States' high incarceration rate gets a lot of attention from scholars, policy makers, and the public. Yet the most common form of criminal justice supervision is not imprisonment but probation--and that is just as true for juveniles as for adults. Probation was originally promoted as an alternative to imprisonment that would spare…
Descriptors: Crime, Juvenile Justice, Delinquency, Institutionalized Persons
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Lundberg, Shelly; Pollak, Robert A. – Future of Children, 2015
Since 1950, marriage behavior in the United States has changed dramatically. Though most men and women still marry at some point in their lives, they now do so later and are more likely to divorce. Cohabitation has become commonplace as either a precursor or an alternative to marriage, and a growing fraction of births take place outside marriage.…
Descriptors: Marriage, Trend Analysis, Divorce, Interpersonal Relationship
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Rosenbaum, Sara; Blum, Robert – Future of Children, 2015
The past century has seen vast improvements in our children's health. The infectious diseases that once killed huge numbers of children have largely been conquered. Infant mortality has also fallen markedly, although the United States lags behind other industrialized nations in this and other measures of children's health. Accidents and injuries…
Descriptors: Child Health, Communicable Diseases, Infant Mortality, Accidents
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Haskins, Ron – Future of Children, 2015
The past four decades have seen a rapid decline in marriage rates and a rapid increase in nonmarital births. These changes have had at least three worrisome effects on children. Scholars disagree about the magnitude of these effects, but surveys and other research evidence appear to definitively establish that the nation has more poverty, more…
Descriptors: Family (Sociological Unit), Marriage, Trend Analysis, Public Policy
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Gundersen, Craig – Future of Children, 2015
Food assistance programs--including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, or food stamps), the National School Lunch Program, and the School Breakfast Program--have been remarkably successful at their core mission: reducing food insecurity among low-income children. Moreover, writes Craig Gundersen, SNAP in particular has also been…
Descriptors: Food, Social Services, Lunch Programs, Breakfast Programs
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Thompson, Ross A. – Future of Children, 2014
Children's early social experiences shape their developing neurological and biological systems for good or for ill, writes Ross Thompson, and the kinds of stressful experiences that are endemic to families living in poverty can alter children's neurobiology in ways that undermine their health, their social competence, and their ability…
Descriptors: Child Development, Stress Variables, Social Experience, Early Experience
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Gundersen, Craig; Ziliak, James P. – Future of Children, 2014
In 2012, nearly 16 million U.S. children, or over one in five, lived in households that were food-insecure, which the U.S. Department of Agriculture defines as "a household-level economic and social condition of limited access to food." Even when we control for the effects of other factors correlated with poverty, these children are more…
Descriptors: Food, Hunger, Child Welfare, Trend Analysis
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Landale, Nancy S.; Thomas, Kevin J. A.; Van Hook, Jennifer – Future of Children, 2011
Children of immigrants are a rapidly growing part of the U.S. child population. Their health, development, educational attainment, and social and economic integration into the nation's life will play a defining role in the nation's future. Nancy Landale, Kevin Thomas, and Jennifer Van Hook explore the challenges facing immigrant families as they…
Descriptors: Human Capital, Poverty, Immigration, Asian Americans
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Borjas, George J. – Future of Children, 2011
Researchers have long known that poverty in childhood is linked with a range of negative adult socioeconomic outcomes, from lower educational achievement and behavioral problems to lower earnings in the labor market. But few researchers have explored whether exposure to a disadvantaged background affects immigrant children and native children…
Descriptors: Poverty, Children, Young Adults, Immigrants
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Kalil, Ariel; Ryan, Rebecca M. – Future of Children, 2010
Rising rates of nonmarital childbirth in the United States have resulted in a new family type, the fragile family. Such families, which include cohabiting couples as well as single mothers, experience significantly higher rates of poverty and material hardship than their married counterparts. Ariel Kalil and Rebecca Ryan summarize the economic…
Descriptors: Mothers, One Parent Family, Community Programs, Private Financial Support
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Balfanz, Robert – Future of Children, 2009
As the twenty-first century opens, says Robert Balfanz, the United States is developing a deep social consensus that American high schools should ensure that all adolescents graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary schooling and training. Balfanz asks how well high schools are succeeding in this mission and whether they can ultimately…
Descriptors: African American Students, Neighborhoods, Suburban Schools, High Schools
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Duncan, Greg J.; Ludwig, Jens; Magnuson, Katherine A. – Future of Children, 2007
Greg Duncan, Jens Ludwig, and Katherine Magnuson explain how providing high-quality care to disadvantaged preschool children can help reduce poverty. In early childhood, they note, children's cognitive and socioemotional skills develop rapidly and are sensitive to "inputs" from parents, home learning environments, child care settings, and the…
Descriptors: Human Capital, Public Policy, Early Childhood Education, Preschool Children
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Berlin, Gordon L. – Future of Children, 2007
Gordon Berlin discusses the nation's long struggle to reduce poverty in families with children, and proposes a counterintuitive solution--rewarding the work of individuals. He notes that policymakers' difficulty in reducing family poverty since 1973 is attributable to two intertwined problems--falling wages among low-skilled workers and the…
Descriptors: Wages, Poverty, Taxes, Tax Credits
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Greenberg, Mark – Future of Children, 2007
In Mark Greenberg's view, a national child care strategy should pursue four goals. Every parent who needs child care to get or keep work should be able to afford care without having to leave children in unhealthy or dangerous environments; all families should be able to place their children in settings that foster education and healthy…
Descriptors: Poverty, Family Income, Tax Credits, Federal Government
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Amato, Paul R.; Maynard, Rebecca A. – Future of Children, 2007
Since the 1970s, the share of U.S. children growing up in single-parent families has doubled, a trend that has disproportionately affected disadvantaged families. Paul Amato and Rebecca Maynard argue that reversing that trend would reduce poverty in the short term and, perhaps more important, improve children's growth and development over the long…
Descriptors: Divorce, Sex Education, Poverty, Marital Satisfaction
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