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Hurd, Noelle; Deutsch, Nancy – Future of Children, 2017
After-school programs offer young people opportunities for self-expression, exploring their talents, and forming relationships with supportive adults. That is, after-school programs promote young people's social and emotional learning (SEL) skills--whether the programs use that term or not. Despite these programs' potential, Noelle Hurd and Nancy…
Descriptors: Social Development, Emotional Development, After School Programs, Educational Policy
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McClelland, Megan M.; Tominey, Shauna L.; Schmitt, Sara A.; Duncan, Robert – Future of Children, 2017
Young children who enter school without sufficient social and emotional learning (SEL) skills may have a hard time learning. Yet early childhood educators say they do not get enough training to effectively help children develop such skills. In this article, Megan McClelland, Shauna Tominey, Sara Schmitt, and Robert Duncan examine the theory and…
Descriptors: Intervention, Early Childhood Education, Best Practices, Social Development
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Kaushal, Neeraj – Future of Children, 2014
Better-educated parents generally have children who are themselves better educated, healthier, wealthier, and better off in almost every way than the children of the less educated. But this simple correlation does not prove that the relationship is causal. Neeraj Kaushal sifts through the evidence from economics and public policy and reviews large…
Descriptors: Intergenerational Programs, Educational Benefits, Educational Attainment, Educational Mobility
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Duncan, Greg J.; Magnuson, Katherine; Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth – Future of Children, 2014
Families who live in poverty face disadvantages that can hinder their children's development in many ways, write Greg Duncan, Katherine Magnuson, and Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal. As they struggle to get by economically, and as they cope with substandard housing, unsafe neighborhoods, and inadequate schools, poor families experience more stress in…
Descriptors: Child Development, Family Income, Stress Variables, Poverty Programs
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Bell, Bradford S.; Federman, Jessica E. – Future of Children, 2013
Over the past decade postsecondary education has been moving increasingly from the classroom to online. During the fall 2010 term 31 percent of U.S. college students took at least one online course. The primary reasons for the growth of e-learning in the nation's colleges and universities include the desire of those institutions to generate…
Descriptors: Postsecondary Education, Educational Technology, Computer Uses in Education, Instructional Effectiveness
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Oreopoulos, Philip; Petronijevic, Uros – Future of Children, 2013
Despite a general rise in the return to college, likely due to technological change, the cost-benefit calculus facing prospective students can make the decision to invest in and attend college dauntingly complex. Philip Oreopoulos and Uros Petronijevic review research on the varying costs and benefits of higher education and explore in full the…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Paying for College, Outcomes of Education, College Attendance
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Kudler, Harold; Porter, Rebecca I. – Future of Children, 2013
Military children don't exist in a vacuum; rather, they are embedded in and deeply influenced by their families, neighborhoods, schools, the military itself, and many other interacting systems. To minimize the risks that military children face and maximize their resilience, write Harold Kudler and Colonel Rebecca Porter, we must go beyond…
Descriptors: Military Personnel, Children, Family Environment, Military Service
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Clever, Molly; Segal, David R. – Future of Children, 2013
Since the advent of the all-volunteer force in the 1970s, marriage, parenthood, and family life have become commonplace in the U.S. military among enlisted personnel and officers alike, and military spouses and children now outnumber service members by a ratio of 1.4 to 1. Reviewing data from the government and from academic and nonacademic…
Descriptors: Military Service, Military Personnel, Family Environment, Family Characteristics
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Holmes, Allison K.; Rauch, Paula K.; Cozza, Stephen J. – Future of Children, 2013
Since the U.S. military began fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan in 2002, approximately two million military children have seen a parent deploy into harm's way at least once, and many families have experienced multiple deployments. Most deployments end with a parent's safe return home, but more than 50,000 service members have been…
Descriptors: Military Service, Military Personnel, Death, War
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Baum, Sandy; Kurose, Charles; McPherson, Michael – Future of Children, 2013
This overview of postsecondary education in the United States reviews the dramatic changes over the past fifty years in the students who go to college, the institutions that produce higher education, and the ways it is financed. The article, by Sandy Baum, Charles Kurose, and Michael McPherson, creates the context for the articles that follow on…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Postsecondary Education, Educational Finance, Institutional Characteristics
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Dynarski, Susan; Scott-Clayton, Judith – Future of Children, 2013
In the nearly fifty years since the adoption of the Higher Education Act of 1965, financial aid programs have grown in scale, expanded in scope, and multiplied in form. As a result, financial aid has become the norm among college enrollees. Aid now flows not only to traditional college students but also to part-time students, older students, and…
Descriptors: Student Financial Aid, Paying for College, Higher Education, Educational Policy
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Venezia, Andrea; Jaeger, Laura – Future of Children, 2013
The vast majority of high school students aspire to some kind of postsecondary education, yet far too many of them enter college without the basic content knowledge, skills, or habits of mind they need to succeed. Andrea Venezia and Laura Jaeger look at the state of college readiness among high school students, the effectiveness of programs in…
Descriptors: Transitional Programs, Postsecondary Education, College Preparation, College Readiness
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Deming, David; Goldin, Claudia; Katz, Lawrence – Future of Children, 2013
For-profit, or proprietary, colleges are the fastest-growing postsecondary schools in the nation, enrolling a disproportionately high share of disadvantaged and minority students and those ill-prepared for college. Because these schools, many of them big national chains, derive most of their revenue from taxpayer-funded student financial aid, they…
Descriptors: Proprietary Schools, Colleges, Student Characteristics, Undergraduate Students
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Waldfogel, Jane; Craigie, Terry-Ann; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne – Future of Children, 2010
Jane Waldfogel, Terry-Ann Craigie, and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn review recent studies that use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS) to examine why children who grow up in single-mother and cohabiting families fare worse than children born into married-couple households. They also present findings from their own new research.…
Descriptors: Behavior Problems, Mothers, Children, Family Structure
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DiGuiseppi, Carolyn; Roberts, Ian G. – Future of Children, 2000
Reviewed 22 studies that examined the impact of interventions delivered in clinical settings (physician's offices, clinics, or hospitals) on child safety practices and unintentional injuries. Counseling and other interventions in clinical settings effectively increased the adoption of some safety practices, but not others. Clinical interventions…
Descriptors: Accidents, Behavior Change, Child Health, Children
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