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Showing 31 to 45 of 178 results Save | Export
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Dotts, Brian W. – Education and Culture, 2016
This article presents a novel account of a key concept in John Dewey's reconstructionist theory specifically related to the nucleus underlying his idea of democracy: intersubjective communication, what Dewey called the "democratic criterion." Many theorists relate democracy to a form of rule. Consequently, discussions of democracy tend…
Descriptors: Philosophy, Democracy, Social Theories, Democratic Values
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Simpson, Douglas J.; Sacken, Donal M. – Education and Culture, 2016
In this study, we examine Dewey's understanding of ethical principles by identifying a number of his primary emphases, including how he thought principles may be reconstructed and employed in schools. We do this by (a) explicating how he understood the reconstruction of general, universal, and absolute ethical claims; (b) anticipating how some…
Descriptors: Educational Principles, Progressive Education, Teaching Methods
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Eastman, Nicholas J.; Boyles, Deron – Education and Culture, 2015
This essay situates John Dewey in the context of the founding of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in 1915. We argue that the 1915 Declaration of Principles, together with World War I, provides contemporary academics important historical justification for rethinking academic freedom and faculty governance in light of…
Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Governance, Progressive Education, Educational History
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Jones, Anne G.; Risku, Michael T. – Education and Culture, 2015
To satisfy the demands of society, the scholar-­practitioner in today's complex world of education must juggle various factors that are related to one another: practice, poiesis, or the creative act, culture, knowledge, and learning. These demands include adherence to education, law, politics, economics, ethics, equity, and social dynamics. The…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Art Education, Visual Arts, Elementary Secondary Education
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Frank, Jeff – Education and Culture, 2015
Harper Lee's novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" is taught in countless public schools and is beloved by many teachers and future teachers. Embedded within this novel--interestingly--is a strong criticism of an approach to education mockingly referred to as the "Dewey Decimal System." In this essay I explore Lee's criticism of…
Descriptors: Novels, Classification, Progressive Education, Criticism
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Furman, Cara E. – Education and Culture, 2015
In this paper, I connect John Dewey's notion that growth occurs through interaction with a diverse community to contemporary discussions of inclusive education. I highlight the importance of materials that offer different access points, the chance for students to listen to one another, and the teacher's openness to each child's potential. Though I…
Descriptors: Inclusion, Educational Philosophy, Access to Education, Theory Practice Relationship
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Weible, Davide – Education and Culture, 2015
The present research focuses on one aspect of John Dewey's teaching methodology--the role of imagination--that, though not fully developed into a coherent theory within his writings on education, and hence underestimated in the subsequent secondary literature, stands up to criticism and still proves to be viable. In the second section of the…
Descriptors: Imagination, Teaching Methods, Cognitive Development, Democracy
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Mayer, Susan Jean – Education and Culture, 2015
As a philosopher, Dewey relied on others to represent and realize the practical implications of his ideas for classroom life. While many educators have ably done so, the empirically grounded markers and measures that Dewey saw as necessary for strengthening progressive practice and communicating with the broader field remain underdeveloped. Here,…
Descriptors: Progressive Education, Interaction, Classroom Techniques, Intelligence
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Deweese-Boyd, Ian T. E. – Education and Culture, 2015
After offering an overview of the Utopian's educational vision, along with their understanding of the obstacles keeping schools from realizing this vision, this paper examines the objection that the Utopians (and John Dewey) naïvely reject the reality of economic motivation in learning. A consideration of Dewey's own understanding of curriculum,…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Progressive Education, Democracy, Educational Theories
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Oliverio, Stefano – Education and Culture, 2015
In this paper, Stefano Oliverio revisits a central theme of John Dewey's "Experience and Education" and shows its continuing relevance by contextualizing it within a momentous issue in education today. More specifically, he attempts to proceed along the path of Dewey's engagement with progressive education by marshalling some of Dewey's…
Descriptors: Technology Uses in Education, Educational Technology, Progressive Education, Teaching Methods
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Gaudelli, William; Laverty, Megan J. – Education and Culture, 2015
The perceived importance of a global experience in higher education is hard to underestimate. University presidents are known to boast of their "percentage," or the proportion of undergraduates who study abroad. At least part of the rationale is a cosmopolitan one: an essential part of being acknowledged as educated derives in part from…
Descriptors: Global Approach, Study Abroad, Higher Education, Educational History
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Macintyre Latta, Margaret; Crichton, Susan – Education and Culture, 2015
An Innovative Learning Centre (ILC) within a Faculty of Education provides the forum to study and give lived expression to the rhythmic workings of experience through documenting a Maker Movement Day for practicing educators. The authors conceptualize a Maker Day as an immersive professional development experience for educators. They believe that…
Descriptors: Metacognition, Teacher Education Programs, Faculty Development, Design
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Stitzlein, Sarah M. – Education and Culture, 2014
Today's social and political context is filled with environmental elements that both support and work against deep, participatory democracy. I argue that certain democratic habits should be nurtured through a supportive formative culture, especially in schools, in order to best achieve good democratic life in the present context. My aim here…
Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Educational Theories, Democratic Values, Habit Formation
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Waks, Leonard J. – Education and Culture, 2014
In his books "Public Opinion" and "The Phantom Public," Walter Lippmann argued that policy leaders should deny the public a significant role in policymaking. Public opinion, he argued, would inevitably be ill-informed, self-interested and readily manipulated. In "The Public and its Problems," Dewey countered Lippmann…
Descriptors: Educational Theories, Social Sciences, Community, Social Theories
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Stark, Jody L. – Education and Culture, 2014
In its broadest sense, pragmatism could be said to be the philosophical orientation of all action research. Action research is characterized by research, action, and participation grounded in democratic principles and guided by the aim of social improvement. Furthermore, action research is an active process of inquiry that does not admit…
Descriptors: Action Research, Educational Theories, Inquiry, Social Science Research
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