NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing 1 to 15 of 36 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Hytten, Kathy – Education and Culture, 2019
In this essay, I reflect on the need for an activist notion of hope as an antidote to the social, political, and educational challenges we face in our current times. I first discuss some of these challenges as well as emergent signs of hope based upon different ways of telling the stories of our present. I then define hope as a way of being and…
Descriptors: Democracy, Reflection, Activism, Psychological Patterns
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Goldberg, Sabrina R. – Education and Culture, 2019
Drawing on Dewey's concepts and thinking, a middle school mathematics teacher at The School at Columbia University describes her teaching practice and role as a field-based teacher-educator and professional development leader during EdTech Summit Africa. Through a first-person account of her experiences in Cape Town, Johannesburg, and Pretoria,…
Descriptors: Communities of Practice, Middle School Teachers, Mathematics Teachers, Teacher Educators
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Harðarson, Atli – Education and Culture, 2018
In "Democracy and Education," John Dewey argued that teachers should have control over their own work. He was, though, not only concerned about workplace democracy for teachers. He also argued against the philosophical underpinnings of educational policies that reproduced social hierarchies in the workplace. The main arguments of Dewey's…
Descriptors: Democracy, Educational Practices, Progressive Education, Educational Policy
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Eastman, Nicholas J.; Boyles, Deron – Education and Culture, 2015
This essay situates John Dewey in the context of the founding of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in 1915. We argue that the 1915 Declaration of Principles, together with World War I, provides contemporary academics important historical justification for rethinking academic freedom and faculty governance in light of…
Descriptors: Academic Freedom, Governance, Progressive Education, Educational History
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Furman, Cara E. – Education and Culture, 2015
In this paper, I connect John Dewey's notion that growth occurs through interaction with a diverse community to contemporary discussions of inclusive education. I highlight the importance of materials that offer different access points, the chance for students to listen to one another, and the teacher's openness to each child's potential. Though I…
Descriptors: Inclusion, Educational Philosophy, Access to Education, Theory Practice Relationship
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Macintyre Latta, Margaret; Crichton, Susan – Education and Culture, 2015
An Innovative Learning Centre (ILC) within a Faculty of Education provides the forum to study and give lived expression to the rhythmic workings of experience through documenting a Maker Movement Day for practicing educators. The authors conceptualize a Maker Day as an immersive professional development experience for educators. They believe that…
Descriptors: Metacognition, Teacher Education Programs, Faculty Development, Design
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Stitzlein, Sarah M. – Education and Culture, 2014
Today's social and political context is filled with environmental elements that both support and work against deep, participatory democracy. I argue that certain democratic habits should be nurtured through a supportive formative culture, especially in schools, in order to best achieve good democratic life in the present context. My aim here…
Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Educational Theories, Democratic Values, Habit Formation
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Bullert, Gary B. – Education and Culture, 2013
Among the most controversial aspects of John Dewey's career as a public intellectual was his conflict with the Communist Party and its various front groups. John Dewey and Sidney Hook co-founded the Committee for Cultural Freedom that directly exposed that pretense of the Popular Front, which excluded the Soviet Union from the list of totalitarian…
Descriptors: Conflict, Political Affiliation, Foreign Countries, Unions
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Gregory, Maughn; Granger, David – Education and Culture, 2012
John Dewey was not a philosopher of education in the now-traditional sense of a doctor of philosophy who examines educational ends, means, and controversies through the disciplinary lenses of epistemology, ethics, and political theory, or of agenda-driven schools such as existentialism, feminism, and critical theory. Rather, Dewey was both an…
Descriptors: Educational Policy, Well Being, Children, Ethics
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Anthamatten, Eric – Education and Culture, 2012
Much of the history of philosophy has deployed the metaphor of sight over and above language of tactility and feeling. The body, the flesh, the hands and feet are seen as impediments to reason's upward journey towards the pure "light" of truth. But it is precisely these tactile points of contact with the world where knowledge and action begins and…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Human Body, Tactual Perception, Behavior Patterns
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kennedy, David – Education and Culture, 2012
The revolution that Matthew Lipman inaugurated in educational theory and practice in his Philosophy for Children program has two dimensions. The first--introducing philosophy as a subject matter in the elementary school--is based on the assumption that childhood is an appropriate stage of life to read, think, and talk about philosophical issues…
Descriptors: Thinking Skills, Educational Theories, Educational Practices, Elementary Schools
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Oliverio, Stefano – Education and Culture, 2012
Against the backdrop of two remarks by Martha Nussbaum on Dewey and Socratic education (which can be connected with a statement by Matthew Lipman about his going beyond Dewey in a Deweyan way), the paper explores what seems to be a sort of ambivalence in Dewey's educational device. On the one hand, by recognizing children as inquirers and the…
Descriptors: Children, Educational Philosophy, Reflection, Epistemology
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Tschaepe, Mark D. – Education and Culture, 2012
Dewey's conception of scientific explanation, which has been neglected by both philosophers of science and philosophers of education, facilitates overcoming the seeming divide between teaching a highly technical and specialized subject matter and encouraging students to successfully engage in the experience of being philosopher-scientists. By…
Descriptors: Science Education, Educational Philosophy, Inquiry, Teaching Methods
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Kennedy, Nadia Stoyanova – Education and Culture, 2012
The paper discusses Matthew Lipman's approach to inquiry as shaped and fashioned by John Dewey's model of scientific inquiry. Although Lipman's program adopted the major aspects of Dewey's pedagogy, at least two characteristics of that program stand out as radically different--his use of relatively free-form philosophical discussions to teach…
Descriptors: Thinking Skills, Educational Experience, Inquiry, Critical Thinking
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Bleazby, Jennifer B. – Education and Culture, 2012
The imagination has traditionally been associated with unreality and is commonly thought to be the antithesis of reason. This is a notion of imagination that can be found in Plato's writing and has influenced modern Western epistemology and educational ideals. As such, traditional schooling, which has focused on the cultivation of reason and the…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Figurative Language, Reflection, Epistemology
Previous Page | Next Page »
Pages: 1  |  2  |  3