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Slone, Lauren K.; Smith, Linda B.; Yu, Chen – Developmental Science, 2019
Object names are a major component of early vocabularies and learning object names depends on being able to visually recognize objects in the world. However, the fundamental visual challenge of the moment-to-moment variations in object appearances that learners must resolve has received little attention in word learning research. Here we provide…
Descriptors: Vocabulary Development, Infants, Object Permanence, Recognition (Psychology)
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Lev, Maria; Gilaie-Dotan, Sharon; Gotthilf-Nezri, Dana; Yehezkel, Oren; Brooks, Joseph L.; Perry, Anat; Bentin, Shlomo; Bonneh, Yoram; Polat, Uri – Developmental Science, 2015
Long-term deprivation of normal visual inputs can cause perceptual impairments at various levels of visual function, from basic visual acuity deficits, through mid-level deficits such as contour integration and motion coherence, to high-level face and object agnosia. Yet it is unclear whether training during adulthood, at a post-developmental…
Descriptors: Visual Impairments, Visual Perception, Visual Acuity, Recognition (Psychology)
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Kim, Hojin I.; Johnson, Scott P. – Developmental Science, 2014
Five- and 3-month-old infants' perception of infant-directed (ID) faces and the role of speech in perceiving faces were examined. Infants' eye movements were recorded as they viewed a series of two side-by-side talking faces, one infant-directed and one adult-directed (AD), while listening to ID speech, AD speech, or in silence. Infants…
Descriptors: Infant Behavior, Recognition (Psychology), Human Body, Eye Movements
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Mondloch, Catherine J.; Segalowitz, Sidney J.; Lewis, Terri L.; Dywan, Jane; Le Grand, Richard; Maurer, Daphne – Developmental Science, 2013
The expertise of adults in face perception is facilitated by their ability to rapidly detect that a stimulus is a face. In two experiments, we examined the role of early visual input in the development of face detection by testing patients who had been treated as infants for bilateral congenital cataract. Experiment 1 indicated that, at age 9 to…
Descriptors: Visual Perception, Recognition (Psychology), Brain Hemisphere Functions, Diagnostic Tests
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Chinello, Alessandro; Cattani, Veronica; Bonfiglioli, Claudia; Dehaene, Stanislas; Piazza, Manuela – Developmental Science, 2013
In the primate brain, sensory information is processed along two partially segregated cortical streams: the ventral stream, mainly coding for objects' shape and identity, and the dorsal stream, mainly coding for objects' quantitative information (including size, number, and spatial position). Neurophysiological measures indicate that such…
Descriptors: Young Children, Adults, Neurological Organization, Individual Development
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Vogel, Margaret; Monesson, Alexandra; Scott, Lisa S. – Developmental Science, 2012
Early in the first year of life infants exhibit equivalent performance distinguishing among people within their own race and within other races. However, with development and experience, their face recognition skills become tuned to groups of people they interact with the most. This developmental tuning is hypothesized to be the origin of adult…
Descriptors: Race, Nonverbal Communication, Infants, Developmental Stages
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Balas, Benjamin – Developmental Science, 2012
During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to "perceptual narrowing", the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in…
Descriptors: Infants, Recognition (Psychology), Human Body, Visual Perception
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Smith, Linda B.; Jones, Susan S. – Developmental Science, 2011
Object substitutions in play (e.g. using a box as a car) are strongly linked to language learning and their absence is a diagnostic marker of language delay. Classic accounts posit a symbolic function that underlies both words and object substitutions. Here we show that object substitutions depend on developmental changes in visual object…
Descriptors: Play, Recognition (Psychology), Visual Perception, Language Acquisition
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Quinn, Paul C.; Kelly, David J.; Lee, Kang; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M. – Developmental Science, 2008
Human infants, just a few days of age, are known to prefer attractive human faces. We examined whether this preference is human-specific. Three- to 4-month-olds preferred attractive over unattractive domestic and wild cat (tiger) faces (Experiments 1 and 3). The preference was not observed when the faces were inverted, suggesting that it did not…
Descriptors: Infants, Recognition (Psychology), Visual Perception, Visual Stimuli
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Balcomb, Frances K.; Gerken, LouAnn – Developmental Science, 2008
Many models of learning rely on accessing internal knowledge states. Yet, although infants and young children are recognized to be proficient learners, the ability to act on metacognitive information is not thought to develop until early school years. In the experiments reported here, 3.5-year-olds demonstrated memory-monitoring skills by…
Descriptors: Tests, Recognition (Psychology), Memorization, Memory
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Leighty, Katherine A.; Menzel, Charles R.; Fragaszy, Dorothy M. – Developmental Science, 2008
Object recognition research is typically conducted using 2D stimuli in lieu of 3D objects. This study investigated the amount and complexity of knowledge gained from 2D stimuli in adult chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") and young children (aged 3 and 4 years) using a titrated series of cross-dimensional search tasks. Results indicate that 3-year-old…
Descriptors: Visual Stimuli, Young Children, Animals, Cognitive Processes
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Robinson, E. J.; Haigh, S. N.; Pendle, J. E. C. – Developmental Science, 2008
In three experiments (N = 48 3- to 4-year olds; 100 3- to 5-year olds; 54 4-year-olds), children who could see or feel a target toy, recognized when they had sufficient information to answer "Which one is it?" and when they needed additional access. They were weaker at taking the informative modality of access when the choice was between seeing…
Descriptors: Recognition (Psychology), Toys, Young Children, Comprehension
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Smith, Alastair D.; Hood, Bruce M.; Hector, Karen – Developmental Science, 2006
The effects of gaze direction on memory for faces were studied in children from three different age groups (6-7, 8-9, and 10-11 years old) using a computerized version of a task devised by Hood, Macrae, Cole-Davies and Dias (2003). Participants were presented with a sequence of faces in an encoding phase, and were then required to judge which…
Descriptors: Visual Stimuli, Age Differences, Visual Perception, Human Body
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Batty, Magali; Taylor, Margot J. – Developmental Science, 2006
Our facial expressions give others the opportunity to access our feelings, and constitute an important nonverbal tool for communication. Many recent studies have investigated emotional perception in adults, and our knowledge of neural processes involved in emotions is increasingly precise. Young children also use faces to express their internal…
Descriptors: Young Children, Child Development, Emotional Response, Nonverbal Communication
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Sangrigoli, Sandy; de Schonen, Scania – Developmental Science, 2004
In adults, three phenomena are taken to demonstrate an experience effect on face recognition: an inversion effect, a non-native face effect (so-called "other-race" effect) and their interaction. It is crucial for our understanding of the developmental perception mechanisms of object processing to discover when these effects are present in…
Descriptors: Visual Perception, Interaction, Child Development, Developmental Stages