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Mercure, Evelyne; Kushnerenko, Elena; Goldberg, Laura; Bowden-Howl, Harriet; Coulson, Kimberley; Johnson, Mark H; MacSweeney, Mairéad – Developmental Science, 2019
Infants as young as 2 months can integrate audio and visual aspects of speech articulation. A shift of attention from the eyes towards the mouth of talking faces occurs around 6 months of age in monolingual infants. However, it is unknown whether this pattern of attention during audiovisual speech processing is influenced by speech and language…
Descriptors: Infants, Bilingualism, Auditory Stimuli, Visual Stimuli
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Broadbent, Hannah J.; Osborne, Tamsin; Mareschal, Denis; Kirkham, Natasha Z. – Developmental Science, 2019
Multisensory tools are commonly employed within educational settings (e.g. Carter & Stephenson, 2012), and there is a growing body of literature advocating the benefits of presenting children with multisensory information over unisensory cues for learning (Baker & Jordan, 2015; Jordan & Baker, 2011). This is even the case when the…
Descriptors: Multisensory Learning, Teaching Methods, Cues, Retention (Psychology)
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Birulés, Joan; Bosch, Laura; Brieke, Ricarda; Pons, Ferran; Lewkowicz, David J. – Developmental Science, 2019
Previous findings indicate that bilingual Catalan/Spanish-learning infants attend more to the highly salient audiovisual redundancy cues normally available in a talker's mouth than do monolingual infants. Presumably, greater attention to such cues renders the challenge of learning two languages easier. Spanish and Catalan are, however,…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Attention, Human Body, Infants
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Hirai, Masahiro; Kanakogi, Yasuhiro – Developmental Science, 2019
The theory of natural pedagogy has proposed that infants can use ostensive signals, including eye contact, infant-directed speech, and contingency to learn from others. However, the role of bodily gestures, such as hand-waving, in social learning has been largely ignored. To address this gap in the literature, this study sought to determine…
Descriptors: Nonverbal Communication, Teaching Methods, Infants, Infant Behavior
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Fló, Ana; Brusini, Perrine; Macagno, Francesco; Nespor, Marina; Mehler, Jacques; Ferry, Alissa L. – Developmental Science, 2019
Before infants can learn words, they must identify those words in continuous speech. Yet, the speech signal lacks obvious boundary markers, which poses a potential problem for language acquisition (Swingley, "Philos Trans R Soc Lond. Series B, Biol Sci" 364(1536), 3617-3632, 2009). By the middle of the first year, infants seem to have…
Descriptors: Neonates, Infants, Experiments, Language Acquisition
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Comishen, Kyle J.; Bialystok, Ellen; Adler, Scott A. – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingualism has been observed to influence cognitive processing across the lifespan but whether bilingual environments have an effect on selective attention and attention strategies in infancy remains an unresolved question. In Study 1, infants exposed to monolingual or bilingual environments participated in an eye-tracking cueing task in which…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Infants, Monolingualism, Eye Movements
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Hoareau, Mélanie; Yeung, H. Henny; Nazzi, Thierry – Developmental Science, 2019
Individual variability in infant's language processing is partly explained by environmental factors, like the quantity of parental speech input, as well as by infant-specific factors, like speech production. Here, we explore how these factors affect infant word segmentation. We used an artificial language to ensure that only statistical…
Descriptors: Infants, Child Language, Language Processing, Environmental Influences
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Fecher, Natalie; Johnson, Elizabeth K. – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingual and monolingual infants differ in how they process linguistic aspects of the speech signal. But do they also differ in how they process non-linguistic aspects of speech, such as who is talking? Here, we addressed this question by testing Canadian monolingual and bilingual 9-month-olds on their ability to learn to identify native…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Monolingualism, Infants, Speech Communication
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Singh, Leher; Quinn, Paul C.; Xiao, Naiqi G.; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingualism exerts early and pervasive effects on cognition, observable in infancy. Thus far, investigations of infant bilingual cognition have focused on sensitivity to visual memory, executive function, and linguistic sensitivity. Much less research has focused on how bilingualism impacts processing of social cues. The present study sought to…
Descriptors: Monolingualism, Bilingualism, Infants, Racial Bias
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Zhao, Li; Heyman, Gail D.; Chen, Lulu; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2018
The present research examined the consequences of telling young children they have a reputation for being smart. Of interest was how this would affect their willingness to resist the temptation to cheat for personal gain as assessed by a temptation resistance task, in which children promised not to cheat in the game. Two studies with 3- and…
Descriptors: Young Children, Reputation, Intelligence, Cheating
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Morey, Candice C.; Mareva, Silvana; Lelonkiewicz, Jaroslaw R.; Chevalier, Nicolas – Developmental Science, 2018
The emergence of strategic verbal rehearsal at around 7 years of age is widely considered a major milestone in descriptions of the development of short-term memory across childhood. Likewise, rehearsal is believed by many to be a crucial factor in explaining why memory improves with age. This apparent qualitative shift in mnemonic processes has…
Descriptors: Eye Movements, Mnemonics, Child Development, Qualitative Research
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Tummeltshammer, Kristen; Amso, Dima – Developmental Science, 2018
The visual context in which an object or face resides can provide useful top-down information for guiding attention orienting, object recognition, and visual search. Although infants have demonstrated sensitivity to covariation in spatial arrays, it is presently unclear whether they can use rapidly acquired contextual knowledge to guide attention…
Descriptors: Visual Perception, Attention, Infants, Eye Movements
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Broadbent, Hannah J.; White, Hayley; Mareschal, Denis; Kirkham, Natasha Z. – Developmental Science, 2018
Multisensory information has been shown to modulate attention in infants and facilitate learning in adults, by enhancing the amodal properties of a stimulus. However, it remains unclear whether this translates to learning in a multisensory environment across middle childhood, and particularly in the case of incidental learning. One hundred and…
Descriptors: Incidental Learning, Multisensory Learning, Children, Attention Control
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Creel, Sarah C. – Developmental Science, 2018
How and when do children become aware that speakers have different accents? While adults readily make a variety of subtle social inferences based on speakers' accents, findings from children are more mixed: while one line of research suggests that even infants may be acutely sensitive to accent unfamiliarity, other studies suggest that 5-year-olds…
Descriptors: Dialects, Pronunciation, Social Cognition, Learning Processes
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Antovich, Dylan M.; Graf Estes, Katharine – Developmental Science, 2018
Bilingual acquisition presents learning challenges beyond those found in monolingual environments, including the need to segment speech in two languages. Infants may use statistical cues, such as syllable-level transitional probabilities, to segment words from fluent speech. In the present study we assessed monolingual and bilingual 14-month-olds'…
Descriptors: Probability, Cues, Infants, Syllables
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