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Ishihara, Toru; Sugasawa, Shigemi; Matsuda, Yusuke; Mizuno, Masao – Developmental Science, 2018
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sports experience (i.e., tennis experience) and executive function in children while controlling for physical activity and physical fitness. Sixty-eight participants (6-12 years old, 34 males and 34 females) were enrolled in regular tennis lessons (mean = 2.4 years,…
Descriptors: Executive Function, Children, Physical Fitness, Athletics
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Horváth, Klára; Hannon, Benjamin; Ujma, Peter P.; Gombos, Ferenc; Plunkett, Kim – Developmental Science, 2018
A broad range of studies demonstrate that sleep has a facilitating role in memory consolidation (see Rasch & Born, 2013). Whether sleep-dependent memory consolidation is also apparent in infants in their first few months of life has not been investigated. We demonstrate that 3-month-old infants only remember a cartoon face approximately…
Descriptors: Memory, Infants, Sleep, Habituation
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Twomey, Katherine E.; Westermann, Gert – Developmental Science, 2018
Infants are curious learners who drive their own cognitive development by imposing structure on their learning environment as they explore. Understanding the mechanisms by which infants structure their own learning is therefore critical to our understanding of development. Here we propose an explicit mechanism for intrinsically motivated…
Descriptors: Infants, Infant Behavior, Child Development, Learning Processes
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Bertels, Julie; San Anton, Estibaliz; Gebuis, Titia; Destrebecqz, Arnaud – Developmental Science, 2017
Extracting the statistical regularities present in the environment is a central learning mechanism in infancy. For instance, infants are able to learn the associations between simultaneously or successively presented visual objects (Fiser & Aslin, 2002; Kirkham, Slemmer & Johnson, 2002). The present study extends these results by…
Descriptors: Infants, Associative Learning, Visual Learning, Cues
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Kirk, Hannah E.; Gray, Kylie; Riby, Deborah M.; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim M. – Developmental Science, 2017
Despite well-documented attention deficits in children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), distinctions across types of attention problems and their association with academic attainment has not been fully explored. This study examines visual attention capacities and inattentive/hyperactive behaviours in 77 children aged 4 to…
Descriptors: Attention Control, Hyperactivity, Attention Deficit Disorders, Intellectual Disability
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Bedford, Rachael; Pickles, Andrew; Gliga, Teodora; Elsabbagh, Mayada; Charman, Tony; Johnson, Mark H. – Developmental Science, 2014
Emerging findings from studies with infants at familial high risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), owing to an older sibling with a diagnosis, suggest that those who go on to develop ASD show early impairments in the processing of stimuli with both social and non-social content. Although ASD is defined by social-communication impairments and…
Descriptors: Infants, Autism, Attention, Eye Movements
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Peykarjou, Stefanie; Westerlund, Alissa; Cassia, Viola Macchi; Kuefner, Dana; Nelson, Charles A. – Developmental Science, 2013
The current study examines the processing of upright and inverted faces in 3-year-old children (n = 35). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded during a passive looking paradigm including adult and newborn face stimuli. We observed three face-sensitive components, the P1, the N170 and the P400. Inverted faces elicited shorter P1 latency and…
Descriptors: Brain Hemisphere Functions, Diagnostic Tests, Toddlers, Cognitive Processes
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Grossmann, Tobias; Missana, Manuela; Friederici, Angela D.; Ghazanfar, Asif A. – Developmental Science, 2012
Integrating the multisensory features of talking faces is critical to learning and extracting coherent meaning from social signals. While we know much about the development of these capacities at the behavioral level, we know very little about the underlying neural processes. One prominent behavioral milestone of these capacities is the perceptual…
Descriptors: Brain, Primatology, Infants, Correlation
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Gaither, Sarah E.; Pauker, Kristin; Johnson, Scott P. – Developmental Science, 2012
We know that early experience plays a crucial role in the development of face processing, but we know little about how infants learn to distinguish faces from different races, especially for non-Caucasian populations. Moreover, it is unknown whether differential processing of different race faces observed in typically studied monoracial infants…
Descriptors: Human Body, Whites, Habituation, Visual Stimuli
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Feldman, Ruth; Singer, Magi; Zagoory, Orna – Developmental Science, 2010
Animal studies demonstrate that maternal touch and contact regulate infant stress, and handling during periods of maternal deprivation attenuates the stress response. To measure the effects of touch on infant stress reactivity during simulated maternal deprivation, 53 dyads were tested in two paradigms: still-face (SF) and still-face with maternal…
Descriptors: Stimulation, Play, Infants, Animals
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Richmond, Jenny; Nelson, Charles A. – Developmental Science, 2009
Here we report evidence from a new eye-tracking measure of relational memory that suggests that 9-month-old infants can encode memories in terms of the relations among items, a function putatively subserved by the hippocampus. Infants learned about the association between faces that were superimposed on unique scenic backgrounds. During test…
Descriptors: Infants, Memory, Human Body, Eye Movements
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DeLoache, Judy S.; LoBue, Vanessa – Developmental Science, 2009
Why are snakes such a common target of fear? One current view is that snake fear is one of several innate fears that emerge spontaneously. Another is that humans have an evolved predisposition to learn to fear snakes. In the first study reported here, 9- to 10-month-old infants showed no differential spontaneous reaction to films of snakes versus…
Descriptors: Animals, Infants, Fear, Films
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Hoehl, Stefanie; Reid, Vincent; Mooney, Jeanette; Striano, Tricia – Developmental Science, 2008
Previous research suggests that by 4 months of age infants use the eye gaze of adults to guide their attention and facilitate processing of environmental information. Here we address the question of how infants process the relation between another person and an external object. We applied an ERP paradigm to investigate the neural processes…
Descriptors: Infants, Human Body, Cognitive Processes, Eye Movements
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Killing, Sarah E. A.; Bishop, Dorothy V. M. – Developmental Science, 2008
Forty toddlers aged 20 to 24 months were presented with 32 pairs of images with the auditory stimulus Look followed by the name of the target image (e.g. "Look...tree") in an intermodal preferential looking (IPL) paradigm. The same series of 16 items was presented first with one image as target and then with the other member of the pair as target.…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Toddlers, Visual Stimuli, Individual Differences
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Casey, B. J.; Davidson, Matthew C.; Hara, Yuko; Thomas, Kathleen M.; Martinez, Antigona; Galvan, Adriana; Halperin, Jeffrey M.; Rodriguez-Aranda, Claudia E.; Tottenham, Nim – Developmental Science, 2004
This study examined the cognitive and neural development of attention switching using a simple forced-choice attention task and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen children and adults made discriminations among stimuli based on either shape or color. Performance on these trials was compared to performance during blocked trials…
Descriptors: Reaction Time, Brain Hemisphere Functions, Developmental Stages, Attention Control
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