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Singh, Leher; Quinn, Paul C.; Xiao, Naiqi G.; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2019
Bilingualism exerts early and pervasive effects on cognition, observable in infancy. Thus far, investigations of infant bilingual cognition have focused on sensitivity to visual memory, executive function, and linguistic sensitivity. Much less research has focused on how bilingualism impacts processing of social cues. The present study sought to…
Descriptors: Monolingualism, Bilingualism, Infants, Racial Bias
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Larsen, Nicole E.; Lee, Kang; Ganea, Patricia A. – Developmental Science, 2018
For millennia, adults have told children stories not only to entertain but also to impart important moral lessons to promote prosocial behaviors. Many such stories contain anthropomorphized animals because it is believed that children learn from anthropomorphic stories as effectively, if not better than, from stories with human characters, and…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Animals, Prosocial Behavior, Preschool Children
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Ding, Xiao Pan; Heyman, Gail D.; Fu, Genyue; Zhu, Bo; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2018
We investigated how the ability to deceive emerges in early childhood among a sample of young preschoolers (Mean age = 34.7 months). We did this via a 10-session microgenetic method that took place over a 10-day period. In each session, children played a zero-sum game against an adult to win treats. In the game, children hid the treats and had…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Deception, Games, Rewards
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Zhao, Li; Heyman, Gail D.; Chen, Lulu; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2018
The present research examined the consequences of telling young children they have a reputation for being smart. Of interest was how this would affect their willingness to resist the temptation to cheat for personal gain as assessed by a temptation resistance task, in which children promised not to cheat in the game. Two studies with 3- and…
Descriptors: Young Children, Reputation, Intelligence, Cheating
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Creel, Sarah C.; Weng, Mengxing; Fu, Genyue; Heyman, Gail D.; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2018
Young children learn multiple cognitive skills concurrently (e.g., language and music). Evidence is limited as to whether and how learning in one domain affects that in another during early development. Here we assessed whether exposure to a tone language benefits musical pitch processing among 3-5-year-old children. More specifically, we compared…
Descriptors: Tone Languages, Preschool Children, Thinking Skills, Intonation
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Cowell, Jason M.; Lee, Kang; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Selcuk, Bilge; Zhou, Xinyue; Decety, Jean – Developmental Science, 2017
Morality is an evolved aspect of human nature, yet is heavily influenced by cultural environment. This developmental study adopted an integrative approach by combining measures of socioeconomic status (SES), executive function, affective sharing, empathic concern, theory of mind, and moral judgment in predicting sharing behavior in children (N =…
Descriptors: Moral Values, Cultural Influences, Socioeconomic Status, Executive Function
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Fu, Genyue; Heyman, Gail D.; Qian, Miao; Guo, Tengfei; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2016
The present study examined whether having a positive reputation to maintain makes young children less likely to cheat. Cheating was assessed through a temptation resistance paradigm in which participants were instructed not to cheat in a guessing game. Across three studies (total N = 361), preschool-aged participants were randomly assigned to…
Descriptors: Cheating, Ethics, Preschool Children, Comparative Analysis
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Xiao, Wen S.; Fu, Genyue; Quinn, Paul C.; Qin, Jinliang; Tanaka, James W.; Pascalis, Olivier; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2015
The present study examined whether perceptual individuation training with other-race faces could reduce preschool children's implicit racial bias. We used an "angry = outgroup" paradigm to measure Chinese children's implicit racial bias against African individuals before and after training. In Experiment 1, children between 4 and 6 years…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Racial Differences, Human Body, Preschool Children
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Anzures, Gizelle; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2010
The present study examined whether 6- and 9-month-old Caucasian infants could categorize faces according to race. In Experiment 1, infants were familiarized with different female faces from a common ethnic background (i.e. either Caucasian or Asian) and then tested with female faces from a novel race category. Nine-month-olds were able to form…
Descriptors: Infants, Classification, Race, Visual Perception
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Quinn, Paul C.; Kelly, David J.; Lee, Kang; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M. – Developmental Science, 2008
Human infants, just a few days of age, are known to prefer attractive human faces. We examined whether this preference is human-specific. Three- to 4-month-olds preferred attractive over unattractive domestic and wild cat (tiger) faces (Experiments 1 and 3). The preference was not observed when the faces were inverted, suggesting that it did not…
Descriptors: Infants, Recognition (Psychology), Visual Perception, Visual Stimuli
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Fu, Genyue; Evans, Angela D.; Wang, Lingfeng; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2008
The present study examined the developmental origin of "blue lies", a pervasive form of lying in the adult world that is told purportedly to benefit a collective. Seven, 9-, and 11-year-old Chinese children were surreptitiously placed in a real-life situation where they decided whether to lie to conceal their group's cheating behavior. Children…
Descriptors: Cheating, Childhood Attitudes, Foreign Countries, Ethics
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Fu, Genyue; Lee, Kang – Developmental Science, 2007
The present study examined the emergence of flattery behavior in young children and factors that might affect whether and how it is displayed. Preschool children between the ages of 3 and 6 years were asked to rate drawings produced by either a present or absent adult stranger (Experiments 1 and 2), child stranger (Experiments 2 and 3), classmate,…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Social Environment, Play, Kindergarten
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Moriguchi, Yusuke; Lee, Kang; Itakura, Shoji – Developmental Science, 2007
The present study examined whether young children's behaviors in the Dimensional Change Card Sorting task can be influenced by their observation of another person performing the task. Experiment 1 showed that after children watched an adult sorting cards according to one rule, although the children were instructed to sort the cards according to a…
Descriptors: Observation, Error Patterns, Young Children, Inhibition
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Kelly, David J.; Quinn, Paul C.; Slater, Alan M.; Lee, Kang; Gibson, Alan; Smith, Michael; Ge, Liezhong; Pascalis, Olivier – Developmental Science, 2005
Adults are sensitive to the physical differences that define ethnic groups. However, the age at which we become sensitive to ethnic differences is currently unclear. Our study aimed to clarify this by testing newborns and young infants for sensitivity to ethnicity using a visual preference (VP) paradigm. While newborn infants demonstrated no…
Descriptors: Neonates, Ethnic Groups, Infants, Age Differences