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Cacchione, Trix; Call, Josep – Developmental Science, 2010
We investigated whether great apes, like human infants, monkeys and dogs, are subject to a strong gravity bias when tested with the tubes task, and--in case of mastery--what the source of competence on the tubes task is. We presented 22 apes with three versions of the tubes task, in which an object is dropped down a tube connected to one of three…
Descriptors: Cues, Infants, Inferences, Animals
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Melis, Alicia P.; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2010
By three years of age, children are skilled at assessing under which circumstances others can see things. However, nothing is known about whether they can use this knowledge to guide their own deceptive behaviour. Here we investigated 3-year-olds' ability to strategically inhibit or conceal forbidden actions that a nearby adult experimenter could…
Descriptors: Cues, Visual Stimuli, Auditory Stimuli, Evaluation Methods
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Buttelmann, David; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2009
Although apes understand others' goals and perceptions, little is known about their understanding of others' emotional expressions. We conducted three studies following the general paradigm of Repacholi and colleagues (1997, 1998). In Study 1, a human reacted emotionally to the hidden contents of two boxes, after which the ape was allowed to…
Descriptors: Nonverbal Communication, Primatology, Animals, Emotional Response
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Krachun, Carla; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2009
A nonverbal false belief task was administered to children (mean age 5 years) and two great ape species: chimpanzees ("Pan troglodytes") and bonobos ("Pan paniscus"). Because apes typically perform poorly in cooperative contexts, our task was competitive. Two versions were run: in both, a human competitor witnessed an experimenter hide a reward in…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Rewards, Primatology, Animals
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Kaminski, Juliane; Tempelmann, Sebastian; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2009
A key skill in early human development is the ability to comprehend communicative intentions as expressed in both nonlinguistic gestures and language. In the current studies, we confronted domestic dogs (some of whom knew many human "words") with a task in which they had to infer the intended referent of a human's communicative act via iconic…
Descriptors: Child Development, Developmental Stages, Animals, Communication Skills
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Buttelmann, David; Carpenter, Malinda; Call, Josep; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2007
Human infants imitate others' actions "rationally": they copy a demonstrator's action when that action is freely chosen, but less when it is forced by some constraint (Gergely, Bekkering & Kiraly, 2002). We investigated whether enculturated chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) also imitate rationally. Using Gergely and colleagues' (2002) basic procedure,…
Descriptors: Infants, Animals, Imitation, Acculturation
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Call, Josep; Hare, Brian; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael – Developmental Science, 2004
Understanding the intentional actions of others is a fundamental part of human social cognition and behavior. An important question is therefore whether other animal species, especially our nearest relatives the chimpanzees, also understand the intentional actions of others. Here we show that chimpanzees spontaneously (without training) behave…
Descriptors: Social Cognition, Visual Perception, Animals, Intention