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Abate, Michelle Ann – Children's Literature in Education, 2016
This essay provides much-needed critical attention and historical context to the long-neglected 1924 edition of Gertrude Chandler Warner's "The Box-Car Children." Commonly overshadowed by its more recent and more popular 1942 version--known as "The Boxcar Children"--this earlier edition calls attention to the original cultural…
Descriptors: Cultural Context, Childrens Literature, Historical Interpretation, Didacticism
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Guanio-Uluru, Lykke – Children's Literature in Education, 2016
Stephenie Meyer's "Twilight" series (2005-2008) and Suzanne Collins' "The Hunger Games" series (2008-2010) have been hugely successful and influential texts, both as best-selling literary works and as action movie franchises. (To avoid confusion, "Twilight" and "The Hunger Games" in this essay refer to the…
Descriptors: Females, Masculinity, Gender Issues, Gender Differences
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Roberts, Lewis – Children's Literature in Education, 2014
This article compares the models of subjectivity and identity in William Steig's 1990 picture book "Shrek!" and in DreamWorks' "Shrek" films. Steig presented his ogre hero as a model of the crises of subjectivity all children must face, and then reassured readers by showing how even a hideous figure such as…
Descriptors: Reflection, Picture Books, Childrens Literature, Films
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Lushchevska, Oksana – Children's Literature in Education, 2014
Viewing Tolstoy's works from psychological and intellectual perspectives demonstrates his approach to children's literacy and especially the development of reasoning, which he presents in his writing for children and the stories he includes in his "New ABC" book (1875a) and four "Readers" (1875b). This article…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Educational Philosophy, Child Development, Didacticism
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Lockwood, Michael – Children's Literature in Education, 2014
This article looks at how four British-based poets born in the Caribbean exploit the rich language repertoire available to them in their work for children and young people. Following initial consideration of questions of definition and terminology, poetry collections by James Berry, John Agard, Grace Nichols and Valerie Bloom are discussed, with a…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Poetry, Language Variation, Creoles
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Lockney, Karen – Children's Literature in Education, 2013
This article provides a close reading of Meg Rosoff's award-winning novel "How I Live Now". It argues that an understanding of the text can be extended through an application of ideas found in contemporary spatial discourse concerning place. Reading the novel within this context allows a discussion of ways in which it draws on…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Novels, Place Based Education, Literary Criticism
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Gill, R. B. – Children's Literature in Education, 2012
The style of Kenneth Grahame's "The Wind in the Willows" arises from an alternative vision and choice of values characteristic of romance. Romance seeks fulfillment beyond the consequences of everyday relationships and the constrictions of ordinary life. Causal relationships give way to lists of independent items, unmotivated outcomes, and…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Classics (Literature), Literary Styles, Romanticism
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Hall, Linda Marian – Children's Literature in Education, 2011
In this study of Jill Paton Walsh's one time-slip novel, I attempt to show how she reinvents the genre by giving as much prominence to the dislocated present as she does to the sufferings of children caught up in the horrors of the Industrial Revolution. Where previous time-slip authors had concentrated on the past, she addresses clearly unwelcome…
Descriptors: Novels, Children, Literary Genres, Conflict
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Latham, Don – Children's Literature in Education, 2007
Magical realism as a literary mode is often subversive and transgressive, questioning the values and assumptions of the dominant society that it depicts. Young adult literature, by contrast, is typically thought to serve a socializing function, helping to integrate young readers into adult society. What then is the cultural work of magical realism…
Descriptors: Novels, Adolescent Literature, Socialization, Literary Styles
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Ringrose, Christopher – Children's Literature in Education, 2007
A & C Black's "Flashbacks" series invites its readers to "Read a "Flashback"..take a journey backwards in time". There are several ways in which children's fiction has encouraged its readers to engage with and care about history: through the presence of ghosts, through frame stories, time travel, or simply setting the narrative in the past.…
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Historiography, Critical Theory, Fiction
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Cadden, Mike – Children's Literature in Education, 2005
Critics and teachers tend to pay attention to genre and ignore mode as an area of consideration. This study examines three novels for young readers that are comparable in terms of their entwining opposing modes (irony and romance, comedy and tragedy) as a successful crossover strategy for appeal to readers young and old. I share implications for…
Descriptors: Books, Childrens Literature, Literary Genres, Figurative Language
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Henderson, Laretta – Children's Literature in Education, 2005
In this article I question whether or not African American young adult literature serves as a primer for, and a version of, African American adult literature. Using the Black Aesthetic as my literary theory and the Coretta Scott King Award as the young adult canon, I note that while the content of adolescent literature is consistent with the…
Descriptors: Adolescent Literature, Childrens Literature, African American Literature, Literary Styles
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Lewis, David – Children's Literature in Education, 2005
In this interview Fiona French discusses her work and career with David Lewis. She describes early influences and stresses her lifelong love of colour and pattern. Amongst other themes she considers the factual basis of most of her books and her lack of interest in fantasy; her preference for clear, simple prose; her constant shifts in style and…
Descriptors: Authors, Interviews, Illustrations, Picture Books
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Alexander, Joy – Children's Literature in Education, 2005
This article examines the verse-novel, a genre that has gained some prominence in children's fiction in the last ten years. Reasons why this may be so are suggested and the chief evolving characteristics of the genre in both content and style are discussed. Notable examples of the verse-novel from Australia, the USA and the UK are analysed.…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Literary Genres, Childrens Literature, Fiction
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Tabbert, Reinbert – Children's Literature in Education, 2000
Considers how a modern author succeeds in giving new life to traditional motifs and patterns. Discusses the first book by Carol Hughes, "Toots and the Upside Down House." Discusses the practice of adopting patterns and motifs of literary traditions. Considers features of postmodernism and biographical implications in her work. (SC)
Descriptors: Childrens Literature, Fantasy, Literary Genres, Literary Styles
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