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Spong, Sheila J. – British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 2012
This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…
Descriptors: Focus Groups, Social Responsibility, Discourse Analysis, Feedback (Response)
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Rizq, Rosemary; Target, Mary – British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 2010
Empirical evidence supporting the inclusion of mandatory training therapy for therapists is sparse. We present results from a mixed methods study designed to interrogate how counselling psychologists' attachment status and levels of reflective function (RF) intersect with how they experience, recall and describe using personal therapy in clinical…
Descriptors: Counseling Psychology, Counselor Client Relationship, Psychologists, Attachment Behavior
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Rizq, Rosemary; Target, Mary – British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 2008
There is a widely acknowledged lack of clarity in psychotherapeutic training about the role of personal therapy in developing practitioner competence. This paper presents part of a wider ongoing qualitative study exploring the role that personal therapy plays in the clinical practice and training of experienced counselling psychologists. Results…
Descriptors: Counseling Psychology, Psychologists, Psychotherapy, Counselor Training
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Hermansson, Gary – British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 1997
Provides an overview of boundary matters and examines essential therapeutic qualities, such as empathy, for their boundary-crossing expectations. Considers boundary management and the never-ending need for dynamic involvement and professional judgment. Claims that boundaries must be preserved, but actions should not be so rigid as to hinder…
Descriptors: Counseling Effectiveness, Counseling Psychology, Counselor Attitudes, Counselor Client Relationship
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Hartmann, Ernest – British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 1997
Discusses the relationship of boundaries to other measures of personality, to dreams and nightmares, to clients' occupations and interests, and to the conduct of psychotherapists and counselors. Explores how some boundary violators have thin boundaries and are unable to maintain clear distinctions between the client's needs and their own needs.…
Descriptors: Counseling Psychology, Counselor Attitudes, Counselor Client Relationship, Counselor Role
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Webb, Susan B. – British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 1997
Reviews the literature on boundary training, along with relevant cultural and social issues. Examines ways in which training may contribute to abuse prevention and identifies key areas for research. Argues that counselors need assistance in internalizing a professional/personal value system that helps them function without external constraints.…
Descriptors: Counseling Psychology, Counselor Attitudes, Counselor Client Relationship, Counselor Role
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Kiemle, Gundi – British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 1994
Discusses supervision and counseling of people with AIDS. Addresses the impact upon the client and the counselor against the background of stigmatization. Conflicts and losses arising at different stages are explored. Discusses implications for the need for supervision to facilitate changes necessary to cope with clients' and counselors' feelings…
Descriptors: Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, Adults, Anxiety, Counseling Psychology
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Owen, Ian R. – British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 1997
Uses the concept of boundary to describe the ground rules, quality, and type of therapeutic relationships in a humanistic form of counseling--a form that blends Rogerian principles with ideas taken from psychodynamic practice. Discusses the work of Robert Langs, boundaries in person-centered work, and the limits of boundaries. (RJM)
Descriptors: Counseling Psychology, Counselor Attitudes, Counselor Client Relationship, Counselor Role