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ERIC Number: EJ1162516
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2017-Oct
Pages: 14
Abstractor: As Provided
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0736-9387
Length Effects in Pseudo-Word Spelling: Stronger in Dyslexic than in Non-Dyslexic Students
Juul, Holger; Petersen, Dorthe Klint
Annals of Dyslexia, v67 n3 p369-382 Oct 2017
It is often discussed whether dyslexics show a deviant pattern of reading and spelling development when compared to typically developing students, or whether they follow the same pattern as other students, only at markedly slower rate. The present cross-sectional study investigated phonological encoding skills in dyslexic Danish students. We compared dyslexic and non-dyslexic students from grades 3, 5, 7, and 9 and examined whether effects of item length were stronger in the dyslexic groups. Mixed between-within subjects analyses of variance revealed significant interactions between dyslexia status and item length as the dyslexics at all grade levels were more affected by item length than their non-dyslexic peers. A marked developmental delay was apparent as the dyslexic group from grade 9 performed on approximately the same level as the non-dyslexic group from grade 3. Although the overall difference between these two groups was not significant, a significant interaction between dyslexia status and item length remained because the grade 9 dyslexics were more affected by item length than the younger non-dyslexic students. This difference in error profiles suggests a difference in the developmental patterns of dyslexic vs. non-dyslexic students.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Grade 3
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Denmark