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Showing 1 to 15 of 26 results Save | Export
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McInnis, Edward C. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Some writers connected to the Peace Movement, many of whom were Quakers, expressed conflicting views on history's value to society and its ability to prevent unnecessary wars. These writers, mostly opponents to the United States' War with Mexico, argued that history education sometimes contributed to war by romanticizing militaristic government…
Descriptors: History Instruction, Peace, Activism, War
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McCullough, D. O. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
In March 1958, a tense six months after the launch of the Russian satellite Sputnik I sent a shockwave of fear and purpose through the United States, an essay published in the Franklin Institute (TFI) monthly member newsletter, "The Institute News," opened with an oddly defiant, even dismissive tone ("Sputnik, Teachers &…
Descriptors: Museums, War, Social Systems, Political Attitudes
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Zervas, Theodore G. – American Educational History Journal, 2016
This paper analyzes several elementary and middle school textbooks, educational decrees, and other primary sources to help shed light on how schooling, and more generally education, during what would be known as the "Reign of the Colonels" or "Military 'Junta'" attempted to reshape a Greek national identity. This paper seeks to…
Descriptors: Textbook Content, Content Analysis, Elementary School Students, Middle School Students
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Watras, Joseph – American Educational History Journal, 2015
This essay will discuss two educational programs to improve the living conditions of students from low income families that Pedro T. Orata conducted during the middle years of the twentieth century. The question this paper will investigate is whether Orata considered the people he was trying to help as being trapped by the conditions of poverty to…
Descriptors: Progressive Education, Developing Nations, Poverty, Educational History
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Scales, T. Laine; Tang, Agnes – American Educational History Journal, 2014
On the eve of her birthday, August 14, 1904, the young Jewell Legett recorded in her diary that she had "been feeling so strange today … 20 years old! What an age it is! Just the time to be a girl and learn to live" (Legett 1904). Her summer vacation from the 1903-1904 term at Baylor University was spent with her parents and brothers in…
Descriptors: Profiles, Foreign Countries, Women Administrators, Females
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Zervas, Theodore G. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
After Greek independence from the Ottoman Empire (1827), a newly formed Greek state looked to retrieve its past through the teaching of a Greek national history. For much of the nineteenth century Greek schools forged common religious, linguistic, and historical ties among the Greek people through the teaching of a Greek historical past (Zervas…
Descriptors: Informal Education, Childrens Literature, Political Influences, Historical Interpretation
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Watras, Joseph – American Educational History Journal, 2012
Writing in 1962, Phillippe Aries argued that an initial step in the movement to establish schools for children in Europe took place during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when moralists and artists began portraying children as different from adults. According to Aries, the portrayal of childhood as a unique period enabled the family and…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Children, Role, Attitudes
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Stallones, Jared – American Educational History Journal, 2010
John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Biographies, Christianity, Information Dissemination
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Beyer, Kalani – American Educational History Journal, 2010
The purpose of this article has been to set the record straight as to the extent to which education of the mind and hands was prevalent in the United States prior to the 1880s. This effort is necessary since the proponents of the manual training curriculum that surfaced in the United States in the 1880s created a misperception that no prior form…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, African Americans, American Indians, Vocational Education
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Laukaitis, John – American Educational History Journal, 2010
With the colonization of Ireland in the 17th century by Cromwellian and Williamite forces, the spread of English as a language of power marked a linguistic shift as Anglicization and economic necessity transformed Irish to a vernacular of the poor. Where Irish was spoken by almost all throughout the country in the 17th century, a steady drop began…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Irish, Organizations (Groups), Language Attitudes
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Brownlee, Kimberly – American Educational History Journal, 2010
This article will examine a little known but long-standing group, the Lisle Fellowship, that endeavored to open the world to college students and foster international understanding--or "world-mindedness," as the organization's founders called it--ultimately with the goal to contribute to the ideal of world peace. It will also, in…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, College Students, Peace, Fellowships
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Clark, Daniel – American Educational History Journal, 2010
Historians of American education readily acknowledge that in the mid-19th century the German university and academic ideal rose in prominence among American academicians, who then worked diligently to replicate the German university model in the United States. During this same time, however, many more Americans were exposed to a different…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Higher Education, Mass Media Role, Success
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Johnson, Linda – American Educational History Journal, 2010
Having limited access to colleges and universities offering women the same educational opportunities available to men, elite women of the 19th century crossed national borders for advanced study and teaching opportunities. The career of Tsuda Umeko, founder of one of the first private institutions of higher education for women in Japan, leader in…
Descriptors: Womens Education, Higher Education, Advocacy, Educational History
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Garrison, Joshua – American Educational History Journal, 2009
Unrealistic as they may have been, television shows like Leave it to Beaver and Ozzie and Harriet served important social purposes during an age of tumult and anxiety. The domestic sit-coms of the 1950s played an educative function by reinforcing and disseminating traditional values at a time when forces of change were becoming quite disruptive.…
Descriptors: United States History, War, Social Systems, Political Attitudes
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Harrington, James J. – American Educational History Journal, 2009
In Central America the Cold War support of the elites by the United States was designed to ward off the communist threat. At the same time social and economic demands by the working and middle classes created revolutionary movements in the face of rigid and violent responses by Central American governments. Issues of social justice pervaded the…
Descriptors: Social Justice, Higher Education, Working Class, Middle Class
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