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Zaino, Karen – American Educational History Journal, 2019
In this article, inspired by Toni Morrison's evocative description of places that are "never going away" and events that "will happen again," the author explores the historical legacies of racism, law enforcement, and educational inequality in Covington, Kentucky. The author argues that these legacies can best be understood by…
Descriptors: State History, Racial Bias, Law Enforcement, Equal Education
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Wheatle, Katherine I. E. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Historical writings about the Morrill Land-Grant Acts are not free from promoting unbiased, dominant ideas about the laws' reach and intentions. The Morrill Acts were major legislation, but they did not signify the entitlement of every citizen; their successes for Black students, communities, and colleges were meager. This study makes common cause…
Descriptors: Race, Educational History, Educational Legislation, Federal Legislation
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James-Gallaway, ArCasia D. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Because gender remains under-examined in extant school desegregation literature, many questions linger about how it shaped the experiences of desegregating students in K-12 schools around the country. In response, this paper provides an analysis of the literature on southern Black desegregating students' firsthand accounts to identify how whites…
Descriptors: School Desegregation, African American Students, United States History, Whites
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Johansen, Alexandra; Slantcheva-Durst, Snejana – American Educational History Journal, 2018
Student fraternities emerged in the late 1700s as an extension of literary societies and debate clubs. A century after their formation, in 1891, national interfraternal associations, or fraternity/sorority councils, also took root. These interfraternal associations would shape the Greek community on college campuses across the country. Decades…
Descriptors: Governing Boards, Universities, Fraternities, Educational History
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Moore, Alfred D., III; Anderson, Christian K. – American Educational History Journal, 2018
The Law School at South Carolina State College, a black college located in Orangeburg, South Carolina, was founded in 1947 as a segregated school to keep black students out of the state's all-white law school. However, this small law school produced in its nineteen-year existence a generation of attorneys whose education and achievements outlived…
Descriptors: Law Schools, Black Colleges, Educational History, United States History
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Stewart, Dafina-Lazarus – American Educational History Journal, 2017
A group of private liberal arts colleges in Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana, formed a voluntary association called the Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) in 1962 based on their self-perceived shared interests and missions. These institutions included Albion College, Antioch College, Denison University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Hope…
Descriptors: African American Students, College Students, Educational Experience, Educational History
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Poos, Bradley W. – American Educational History Journal, 2016
The year 1968 denotes a particularly salient moment in American history, not least because it marks the year in which the Civil Rights movement lost its charismatic leader, Martin Luther King, Jr. The assassination of King on April 4, 1968, resulted in widespread and spontaneous uprisings across the country, including one in Kansas City. Not…
Descriptors: Educational History, Race, Violence, Racial Bias
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Poos, Bradley W. – American Educational History Journal, 2015
Central High School in Kansas City, Missouri is one of the oldest schools west of the Mississippi and the first public high school built in Kansas City. Kansas City's magnet plan resulted in Central High School being rebuilt as the Central Computers Unlimited/Classical Greek Magnet High School, a school that was designed to offer students an…
Descriptors: High Schools, Magnet Schools, Athletics, Athletic Coaches
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Poch, Robert K. – American Educational History Journal, 2015
This article explores the complex contexts and relationships that enabled student civil rights advocates to emerge at Howard University in the 1930s and 1940s. Such histories are valuable given their realistic portrayal of the daily challenges, interpersonal collisions, collaborations, and organizational positioning that made some human rights…
Descriptors: Black Colleges, College Students, Civil Rights, Activism
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McGee, Melandie; Platt, R. Eric – American Educational History Journal, 2015
One of the most well-known and infamous student protests was the Kent State University shootings of 1970. The aftermath of the Kent State tragedy gave rise to protests and riots on hundreds of college and university campuses across the nation. In the American South, only ten days after the Kent Sate tragedy, a very similar incident occurred on the…
Descriptors: Educational History, Violence, College Students, Activism
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Davis, Donna M. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
At a time when most other institutions of higher education in the country excluded ex-slaves from admission, the University of Kansas conferred degrees upon sixty African Americans by 1910. However, while the university did allow ex-slaves to matriculate, these students still experienced a degree of exclusion and encountered barriers of racial…
Descriptors: Educational Experience, Slavery, African American Education, African American History
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Morowski, Deborah L. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
After the Civil War, schooling for African Americans was irregular and consisted mainly of elementary grades. Education was provided, primarily, by elite, private institutions and fewer than three percent of students aged 13-17 attended regularly. In 1896, the United States Supreme Court issued a ruling in "Plessey v. Ferguson." Although…
Descriptors: Public Opinion, Hidden Curriculum, School Segregation, Court Litigation
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Ellis, Mark – American Educational History Journal, 2013
During the early 1920s, the question of who should control the schooling of African American children caused controversy in several Southern states, including Georgia. White educationists and bureaucrats were divided into two groups: the conservatives who called for educational needs to be determined and funded locally, and a growing reformist…
Descriptors: Race, Educational History, African American Students, School Buildings
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Danns, Dionne – American Educational History Journal, 2010
This article will focus on the efforts of the State of Illinois to desegregate Chicago Public Schools between 1971 and 1979. The article also examines the responsibility taken on by the State of Illinois to desegregate schools and the limits between establishing the mechanisms to desegregate and the ability to accomplish those goals in Chicago.…
Descriptors: Public Schools, Desegregation Plans, School Desegregation, State Officials
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Riley, Karen L. – American Educational History Journal, 2010
In the current vernacular, co-education means the education of the sexes together within an institutional setting. Once a phenomenon, today, women enjoy nearly equal status on campuses that were at one time bastions of "maleness." Moreover, the counter-culture revolution of the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s, ushered in a new…
Descriptors: Coeducation, African American Students, White Students, Womens Education
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