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Showing 1 to 15 of 79 results Save | Export
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Kaniuka, Polina – American Educational History Journal, 2019
This study attempts an analysis from 1944 to 1975 focused on the federal government support in the context of one highly successful program in international education--Fulbright's Amendment to the Surplus Property Act of 1946 (or the Fulbright Program). The choice fell on this flagship international educational exchange program for its explicit…
Descriptors: International Education, International Educational Exchange, Exchange Programs, Partnerships in Education
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Mason, Curtis – American Educational History Journal, 2019
While recovering from the Civil War in 1860s, Kansas City acquired the site of the first bridge over the Missouri River, the Hannibal Bridge, which was completed in 1869. In doing so, Kansas City beat out competing cities like Leavenworth, Kansas; Atchison, Kansas; and St. Joseph, Missouri. This led to rapid population increases from 4,418 in…
Descriptors: Superintendents, Teacher Education Programs, School Districts, Teacher Education
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McInnis, Edward C. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Some writers connected to the Peace Movement, many of whom were Quakers, expressed conflicting views on history's value to society and its ability to prevent unnecessary wars. These writers, mostly opponents to the United States' War with Mexico, argued that history education sometimes contributed to war by romanticizing militaristic government…
Descriptors: History Instruction, Peace, Activism, War
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Graham, M. R.; Burlbaw, Lynn M. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
The Civil War was concluded over 150 years ago but recently, monuments erected to commemorate the Civil War and its participants have been the site of civil unrest (e.g., Charlottesville, VA in 2018) and calls for removal of such monuments. The Confederate monuments debate has been going strong for decades, and it seems to have been picking up…
Descriptors: History Instruction, United States History, War, Controversial Issues (Course Content)
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Zaino, Karen – American Educational History Journal, 2019
In this article, inspired by Toni Morrison's evocative description of places that are "never going away" and events that "will happen again," the author explores the historical legacies of racism, law enforcement, and educational inequality in Covington, Kentucky. The author argues that these legacies can best be understood by…
Descriptors: State History, Racial Bias, Law Enforcement, Equal Education
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Evaniuck, Jayson – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Harry S. Broudy (1905-1998) was a vital education philosopher of the second half of the twentieth century as highlighted by numerous authors writing on his life and work. Over a 40-year period, Harry Broudy published over 300 papers and 18 books (Vandenberg 1992b). While numerous ideas are reoccurring among his publications, the content and…
Descriptors: Educational Philosophy, Advocacy, Teacher Education, Teaching (Occupation)
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Wraga, William G. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Educational historians have established that progressive education was a multifaceted, diversified approach to education reform, and have recognized that such a variegated phenomenon is difficult, if not impossible, to define. Instead, historians attempt to capture the complexity of progressive education either by articulating its principal…
Descriptors: Educational History, Progressive Education, Educational Philosophy, Educational Theories
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James-Gallaway, ArCasia D. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
Because gender remains under-examined in extant school desegregation literature, many questions linger about how it shaped the experiences of desegregating students in K-12 schools around the country. In response, this paper provides an analysis of the literature on southern Black desegregating students' firsthand accounts to identify how whites…
Descriptors: School Desegregation, African American Students, United States History, Whites
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Morris, Wade H. – American Educational History Journal, 2019
In 1955, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church called for the racial desegregation of Episcopal institutions: parishes, seminaries, and schools. The study of Episcopal school desegregation reveals a fundamental paradox: Episcopal theology promoted desegregation but "white flight" spurred Episcopal school growth. The question of…
Descriptors: Whites, Protestants, Churches, School Desegregation
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Barber, Marlin – American Educational History Journal, 2018
When examining the efforts of African Americans to create and operate viable primary and secondary schools from 1865 to 1870 in Kentucky, it is difficult to not contemplate what potentially might have been had national support for the Black transition from enslavement to freedom not waned. W.E.B. Dubois and several subsequent historians concluded…
Descriptors: Slavery, African Americans, Elementary Schools, Secondary Schools
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Beyer, Carl Kalani – American Educational History Journal, 2018
This article examines counter-hegemony occurring through the development of the Hawaiian language immersion movement, successfully leading to the saving of both Hawaiian culture and the Hawaiian language. After almost 100 years without Hawaiian being the language of instruction, it has re-emerged. Counter-hegemony began in the 1960s with the…
Descriptors: Malayo Polynesian Languages, Hawaiians, Immersion Programs, Cultural Maintenance
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Gunn, Dennis – American Educational History Journal, 2018
Rapid changes in American society in the early twentieth century fostered both a general sense of optimism for America's future and a perceived sense of moral dislocation affecting present and future generations of America's youth. Urbanization, modernization, and the increasing presence of immigrant populations were often viewed as challenges to…
Descriptors: Moral Development, Values Education, United States History, Political Attitudes
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Perrotta, Katherine – American Educational History Journal, 2018
The sixties and seventies were a time of great cultural, social, and political change in the United States. Events including civil rights demonstrations, anti-war protests, environmental movements, and gender rights sparked activism among students and young people across the country. In order for American youth to mobilize, they turned to…
Descriptors: United States History, Activism, Geographic Regions, Social Change
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McCarther, Shirley Marie; Davis, Donna M. – American Educational History Journal, 2017
Gloria Ladson-Billings' (1995) ground-breaking work around the theory of culturally relevant pedagogy has shaped the discourse in schools and education programs for over twenty years. Her belief that schools should be places where students and teachers come together to have meaningful educational experiences has provided a foundation for…
Descriptors: Culturally Relevant Education, Urban Schools, Teaching Methods, Educational Experience
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Garry, Vanessa – American Educational History Journal, 2017
The discriminatory practices against African Americans during the Jim Crow era in St. Louis, Missouri did not deter Dr. Ruth Harris, the first African American female president of Stowe Teachers College (STC) in St. Louis, from accepting the challenge of leading the African American teachers' college from 1940 to 1954. Her appointment to President…
Descriptors: Preservice Teacher Education, African American Education, African American Teachers, African American Leadership
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