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Stewart, Dafina-Lazarus – American Educational History Journal, 2017
A group of private liberal arts colleges in Ohio, Michigan, and Indiana, formed a voluntary association called the Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA) in 1962 based on their self-perceived shared interests and missions. These institutions included Albion College, Antioch College, Denison University, DePauw University, Earlham College, Hope…
Descriptors: African American Students, College Students, Educational Experience, Educational History
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Lozano, Jon M. – American Educational History Journal, 2016
Colleges and universities across the United States have, over the centuries of their existence, gradually developed the systems of governance that we see today. Typically, this has taken the form of a governing board comprised of individuals with some connection to the institution. Although major restructuring of institutional governance may seem…
Descriptors: Trustees, Governance, Governing Boards, Case Studies
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Beineke, John A. – American Educational History Journal, 2015
Herman B Wells served as president of Indiana University from 1938 to 1962--from the days of the Great Depression into the turbulent 1960s. Alfred C. Kinsey was a professor, zoologist, and human sexuality researcher at Indiana University from 1920 until his death in 1956. A unique and paradoxical professional relationship existed between these two…
Descriptors: Higher Education, Partnerships in Education, Interprofessional Relationship, Individual Characteristics
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Weber, Carolyn A. – American Educational History Journal, 2013
Millions visited the World's Columbian Exhibition in Chicago between May and October, 1893. World's fairs and exhibitions had grown and developed grander purposes since the first one in London in 1851: "Beginning as large international industrial displays and showcases for the new inventions and discoveries of science and technology, they…
Descriptors: Indigenous Populations, American Indians, American Indian Culture, Exhibits
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Lauzon, Glenn P. – American Educational History Journal, 2012
In the closing weeks of 1867, an educational organization was founded in Washington, D.C., that should have been stillborn. Most farmers dismissed scientific agriculture as useless book-farming. They should have been lukewarm to the Patrons of Husbandry's promise to sponsor monthly meetings for mutual instruction in the application of scientific…
Descriptors: Rural Areas, Public Policy, Historians, Educational History
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Lauzon, Glenn P. – American Educational History Journal, 2010
For most of the nineteenth century, county agricultural fairs had little to do with schools and schooling; nevertheless, they served as potent sources of learning. During the post-Civil War generation, most of the learning county agricultural fairs generated had little to do with livestock, crops, and cultivation; nevertheless, farmers and others…
Descriptors: Citizenship Education, Counties, Agriculture, Exhibits
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Ryan, Ann Marie – American Educational History Journal, 2006
Catholic high schools in Chicago came onto the educational landscape in significant number in the 1920s, a critical time period in American educational history. In an era focused on efficiency and compulsory schooling, Catholic high schools organized themselves to meet the legal statutes affecting them directly and those that would govern their…
Descriptors: Catholic Schools, Urban Schools, High Schools, Social Mobility